Defibrillation success rates for electrically-induced fibrillation: Hair of the dog

Mark W. Kroll, Raymond M. Fish, Hugh Calkins, Henry Halperin, Dhanunjaya Lakkireddy, Dorin Panescu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Accidental electrocutions kill about 1000 individuals annually in the USA alone. There has not been a systematic review or modeling of elapsed time duration defibrillation success rates following electrically-induced VF. With such a model, there may be an opportunity to improve the outcomes for industrial electrocutions and further understand arrest-related-deaths where a TASER ® electrical weapon was involved. We searched for MedLine indexed papers dealing with defibrillation success following electrically-induced VF with time durations of 1 minute or greater post VF induction. We found 10 studies covering a total of 191 experiments for defibrillation of electrically-induced VF for post-induction durations out to 16 minutes including 0-9 minutes of pre-shock chest compressions. The results were fitted to a logistic regression model. Total minutes of VF and use of pre-shock chest compressions were significant predictors of success (p <.00005 and p=.003 respectively). The number of minutes of chest compressions was not a predictor of success. With no compressions, the 90% confidence of successful defibrillation is reached at 6 minutes and the median time limit for success is 9.5 minutes. However, with pre-shock chest compressions, the modeled data suggest a 90% success rate at 10 minutes and a 50% rate at 14 minutes.1

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2012
Pages689-693
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 14 2012
Event34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 28 2012Sep 1 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/28/129/1/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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