Decision-making and facial emotion recognition as predictors of substance-use initiation among adolescents

Monique Ernst, David A. Luckenbaugh, Eric T. Moolchan, Veronica A. Temple, Jessica Jenness, Katherine E. Korelitz, Edythe D. London, Alane S. Kimes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This 4-year longitudinal study examined whether performance on a decision-making task and an emotion-processing task predicted the initiation of tobacco, marijuana, or alcohol use among 77 adolescents. Of the participants, 64% met criteria for an externalizing behavioral disorder; 33% did not initiate substance use; 13% used one of the three substances under investigation, 18% used two, and 36% used all three. Initiation of substance use was associated with enhanced recognition of angry emotion, but not with risky decision-making. In conclusion, adolescents who initiate drug use present vulnerability in the form of bias towards negative emotion but not toward decisions that involve risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-289
Number of pages4
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Adolescent development
  • Alcohol
  • Drug experimentation
  • Marijuana
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Ernst, M., Luckenbaugh, D. A., Moolchan, E. T., Temple, V. A., Jenness, J., Korelitz, K. E., London, E. D., & Kimes, A. S. (2010). Decision-making and facial emotion recognition as predictors of substance-use initiation among adolescents. Addictive Behaviors, 35(3), 286-289. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.10.014