Cytomegalovirus infection of rats increases the neointimal response to vascular injury without consistent evidence of direct infection of the vascular wall

Yi Fu Zhou, Matie Shou, Esther Guetta, Raul Guzman, Ellis F. Unger, Zu Xi Yu, Jun Zhang, Toren Finkel, Stephen E. Epstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background - Previous studies suggest that infection may play a role in restenosis and atherogenesis; cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the implicated pathogens. To determine a potential causal role of CMV in these disease processes, we assessed whether CMV infection increases the neointimal response to injury of the rat carotid artery. Methods and Results - Carotid injury was performed on 60 rats; immediately thereafter, 30 rats were infected with rat CMV, and the other 30 were mock-infected. Six weeks later, rats were euthanized, and the salivary glands, spleen, and carotid arteries were harvested. CMV infection was associated with significant exacerbation of the neointimal response to injury (neointimal to medial ratio 0.81 ± 0.59 versus 0.31 ± 0.38 in CMV-infected versus control rats; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1569-1575
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation
Volume100
Issue number14
StatePublished - Oct 5 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Balloon
  • Cytokines
  • Restenosis
  • Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Zhou, Y. F., Shou, M., Guetta, E., Guzman, R., Unger, E. F., Yu, Z. X., Zhang, J., Finkel, T., & Epstein, S. E. (1999). Cytomegalovirus infection of rats increases the neointimal response to vascular injury without consistent evidence of direct infection of the vascular wall. Circulation, 100(14), 1569-1575.