Cystic fibrosis presenting as recurrent pancreatitis in a young child with a normal sweat test and pancreas divisum: A case report

Laurie Conklin, Pamela L. Zeitlin, Carmen Cuffari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Pancreatitis is a rare manifestation of cystic fibrosis (CF) and may rarely be the presenting symptom in adolescent or adult patients with CF. We report a case of a 4 year-old female who initially presented with recurrent pancreatitis, a normal sweat test, and a diagnosis of pancreas divisum. She was subsequently diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at the age of 6 years, despite normal growth and no pulmonary symptoms, after nasal potential difference measurements suggested possible CF and two known CF-causing mutations (ΔF508 and L997F) were detected. Case Presentation: An otherwise healthy 4 year-old female developed chronic pancreatitis and was diagnosed with pancreas divisum. Sphincterotomy was performed without resolution of her pancreatitis. Sweat test was negative for cystic fibrosis, but measurement of nasal potential differences suggested possible cystic fibrosis. These results prompted extended Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Conductance (CFTR) mutational analysis that revealed a compound heterozygous mutation: ΔF508 and L997F. Conclusion: CFTR mutations should be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent pancreatitis despite a negative sweat test and the presence of pancreas divisum. Children with CFTR mutations may present with recurrent pancreatitis, lacking any other signs or symptoms of cystic fibrosis. It is possible that the combination of pancreas divisum and abnormal CFTR function may contribute to the severity and frequency of recurrent pancreatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number176
JournalJournal of Medical Case Reports
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 23 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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