CXCR6 gene characterization in two ethnically distinct South African populations and association with viraemic disease control in HIV-1-infected black South African individuals

Anabela C.P. Picton, Maria Paximadis, Richard E. Chaisson, Neil A. Martinson, Caroline T. Tiemessen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

CXCR6 genetic variation was described for HIV-1-uninfected black (n = 41) and Caucasian (n = 40) South Africans. We also investigated the CXCR6 rs2234358 and rs2234355 single nucleotide polymorphisms in HIV-1 disease control in 124 HIV-1-infected drug-naïve black individuals [elite controllers (n = 11), viraemic controllers (VCs, n = 30), high viral load long-term nonprogressors (HVL LTNPs, n = 11) and progressors (n = 72)] compared to healthy controls (HCs; n = 232). The rs2234358-T allele was underrepresented in VCs (40.0%) compared to HCs (59%, P = 0.006), HVL LTNPs (72.7%, P = 0.012) and progressors (59%, P = 0.014). The rs2234358-TT genotype was underrepresented in VCs (7%) compared to progressors (32%; OR = 6.57, P = 0.006) and HCs (35%; OR = 7.18, P = 0.001, Pbonferroni = 0.034). The rs2234355-GA genotype was overrepresented in VCs (80%) compared to HCs (50.4%; OR = 0.25, P = 0.003) and progressors (29.17%; OR = 0.10, P = 3.8 × 10− 5, Pbonferroni = 0.001). The combination of rs2234355-GA in the absence of rs2234358-TT was overrepresented in VCs (80%) compared to HCs (32.6%, OR = 0.12, P = 1 × 10− 6, Pbonferroni = 3.4 × 10− 5) and to progressors (16.7%; OR = 0.05, P < 1 × 10− 8, Pbonferroni < 1 × 10− 7).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-79
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume180
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • CXCR6
  • HIV-1 control
  • Haplotypes
  • Single nucleotide polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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