Current paradigms for metastatic spinal disease: An evidence-based review

P. E. Kaloostian, A. Yurter, P. L. Zadnik, Daniel Sciubba, Z. L. Gokaslan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Management of metastatic spine disease is quite complex. Advances in research have allowed surgeons and physicians to better provide chemotherapeutic agents that have proven more efficacious. Additionally, the advancement of surgical techniques and radiosurgical implementation has altered drastically the treatment paradigm for metastatic spinal disease. Nevertheless, the physician-patient relationship, including extensive discussion with the neurosurgeon, medicine team, oncologists, radiation oncologists, and psychologists, are all critical in the evaluation process and in delivering the best possible care to our patients. The future remains bright for continued improvement in the surgical and nonsurgical management of our patients with metastatic spine disease. Methods: We include an evidence-based review of decision making strategies when attempting to determine most efficacious treatment options. Surgical treatments discussed include conventional debulking versus en bloc resection, conventional RT, and radiosurgical techniques, and minimally invasive approaches toward treating metastatic spinal disease. Conclusions: Surgical oncology is a diverse field in medicine and has undergone a significant paradigm shift over the past few decades. This shift in both medical and surgical management of patients with primarily metastatic tumors has largely been due to the more complete understanding of tumor biology as well as due to advances in surgical approaches and instrumentation. Furthermore, radiation oncology has seen significant advances with stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy contributing to a decline in surgical treatment of metastatic spinal disease. We analyze the entire spectrum of treating patients with metastatic spinal disease, from methods of diagnosis to the variety of treatment options available in the published literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-262
Number of pages15
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

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Spinal Diseases
Spine
Medicine
Therapeutics
Physician-Patient Relations
Radiation Oncology
Radiosurgery
Neoplasms
Spectrum Analysis
Decision Making
Radiotherapy
Psychology
Physicians
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Current paradigms for metastatic spinal disease : An evidence-based review. / Kaloostian, P. E.; Yurter, A.; Zadnik, P. L.; Sciubba, Daniel; Gokaslan, Z. L.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 248-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaloostian, P. E. ; Yurter, A. ; Zadnik, P. L. ; Sciubba, Daniel ; Gokaslan, Z. L. / Current paradigms for metastatic spinal disease : An evidence-based review. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 248-262.
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