Current alcohol use is associated with a reduced risk of hot flashes in midlife women

Chrissy Schiling, Lisa Gallicchio, Susan R. Miller, Janice K. Babus, Lynn M. Lewis, Howard Zacur, Jodi A. Flaws

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To examine the relation between current alcohol use, estradiol, estrone, and testosterone levels, and hot flashes in midlife women using a case-control study design. Methods: Cases were midlife women (45-54 years) who reported ever experiencing hot flashes. Controls were midlife women (45-54 years) who reported never experiencing hot flashes. Each participant completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample that was used to measure estradiol, estrone, and testosterone levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The results indicate that current alcohol use (at least one day per month) was significantly associated with a reduced risk of hot flashes compared to non-use of alcohol, independent of age and smoking habits. The hot flashes experienced by current alcohol users were less severe and less frequent than those experienced by non-users of alcohol. Further, current alcohol users had similar levels of estradiol, estrone, and testosterone compared to non-users of alcohol. Conclusions: These data suggest that current alcohol use is associated with a reduced risk of any, severe, and frequent hot flashes in midlife women by a mechanism that may not include changes in sex steroid hormone levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-568
Number of pages6
JournalAlcohol and Alcoholism
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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