Culture shift in obesity prevalence: Productivity impact on petrochemical population

Faiyaz A. Bhojani, Shan P. Tsai, Robin P. Donnelly

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the consequence of shifting trends in obesity over 30 years on the loss of productivity of a population of petrochemical employees due to illness absence. Methods: The obesity prevalence data were extracted from the Shell Health Surveillance System, which includes morbidity, mortality and physical examination data, including biometrics (height and weight). Absenteeism data were collected from the Shell People System, which includes employee attendance and absenteeism records. Productivity losses were calculated based on the differential workdays lost between obese and normal weight employees. Impact of productivity loss due to obesity on a variety of health conditions was calculated. Results: Prevalence of obesity among Shell employees increased from 14% in 1982 to 42% in 2007. In 1982, lost productivity from obesity was estimated to be 8,520 days, but by 1992, work lost had surpassed 16,680 days. In 2007, work lost from obesity was almost 25,500 days; a 3 fold increase over 25 years. The direct loss of productivity in 1982, 1992 and 2007 was estimated to be USD 2,281,000, USD 4,270,000, and USD 6,513,000, respectively. Conclusions: The productivity impact to employers due to obesity will continue to rise unless effective measures are taken in support of employees achieving and sustaining healthy weight. In the US population, Obesity has now replaced smoking as the number one driver for productivity losses due both work-related and personal injury and illness as well as reduced life expectancy. In addition, it is a key contributor to enhanced health care costs. A focused and joint strategy between Health, Safety and Benefit (HR) professionals with business leadership is required to achieve a sustainable change in lifestyle changes, both at and outside of work. Such changes include, diet modifications and promotion of regular physical activity, involvement of personal physicians and family members, incentives for action and outcome as well as environmental changes in the workplace to minimize the future impact of the loss of productivity and improvement of health, safety and well being of staff.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSociety of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges
Pages461-465
Number of pages5
Volume1
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventSPE/APPEA International Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges - Perth, WA, Australia
Duration: Sep 11 2012Sep 13 2012

Other

OtherSPE/APPEA International Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges
CountryAustralia
CityPerth, WA
Period9/11/129/13/12

Fingerprint

obesity
Petrochemicals
Productivity
productivity
Personnel
Health
shell
health and safety
physical activity
petrochemical
biometry
life expectancy
morbidity
Biometrics
Nutrition
smoking
workplace
Health care
lifestyle
leadership

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Bhojani, F. A., Tsai, S. P., & Donnelly, R. P. (2012). Culture shift in obesity prevalence: Productivity impact on petrochemical population. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges (Vol. 1, pp. 461-465)

Culture shift in obesity prevalence : Productivity impact on petrochemical population. / Bhojani, Faiyaz A.; Tsai, Shan P.; Donnelly, Robin P.

Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges. Vol. 1 2012. p. 461-465.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bhojani, FA, Tsai, SP & Donnelly, RP 2012, Culture shift in obesity prevalence: Productivity impact on petrochemical population. in Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges. vol. 1, pp. 461-465, SPE/APPEA International Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges, Perth, WA, Australia, 9/11/12.
Bhojani FA, Tsai SP, Donnelly RP. Culture shift in obesity prevalence: Productivity impact on petrochemical population. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges. Vol. 1. 2012. p. 461-465
Bhojani, Faiyaz A. ; Tsai, Shan P. ; Donnelly, Robin P. / Culture shift in obesity prevalence : Productivity impact on petrochemical population. Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE/APPEA Int. Conference on Health, Safety and Environment in Oil and Gas Exploration and Production 2012: Protecting People and the Environment - Evolving Challenges. Vol. 1 2012. pp. 461-465
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