Crowdsourced peer-versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages

Heather L. Coley, Rajani S. Sadasivam, Jessica H. Williams, Julie E. Volkman, Yu Mei Schoenberger, Connie L. Kohler, Heather Sobko, Midge N. Ray, Jeroan J. Allison, Daniel E Ford, Gregg H. Gilbert, Thomas K. Houston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Tailored, web-assisted interventions can reach many smokers. Content from other smokers (peers) through crowdsourcing could enhance relevance. Purpose To evaluate whether peers can generate tailored messages encouraging other smokers to use a web-assisted tobacco intervention (Decide2Quit.org). Methods Phase 1: In 2009, smokers wrote messages in response to scenarios for peer advice. These smoker-to-smoker (S2S) messages were coded to identify themes. Phase 2: resulting S2S messages, and comparison expert messages, were then e-mailed to newly registered smokers. In 2012, subsequent Decide2Quit.org visits following S2S or expert-written e-mails were compared. Results Phase 1: a total of 39 smokers produced 2886 messages (message themes: attitudes and expectations, improvements in quality of life, seeking help, and behavioral strategies). For not-ready-to-quit scenarios, S2S messages focused more on expectations around a quit attempt and how quitting would change an individual's quality of life. In contrast, for ready-to-quit scenarios, S2S messages focused on behavioral strategies for quitting. Phase 2: In multivariable analysis, S2S messages were more likely to generate a return visit (OR=2.03, 95% CI=1.74, 2.35), compared to expert messages. A significant effect modification of this association was found, by time-from-registration and message codes (both interaction terms p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-550
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Smoking Cessation
Crowdsourcing
Quality of Life
Postal Service
Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Coley, H. L., Sadasivam, R. S., Williams, J. H., Volkman, J. E., Schoenberger, Y. M., Kohler, C. L., ... Houston, T. K. (2013). Crowdsourced peer-versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45(5), 543-550. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.004

Crowdsourced peer-versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages. / Coley, Heather L.; Sadasivam, Rajani S.; Williams, Jessica H.; Volkman, Julie E.; Schoenberger, Yu Mei; Kohler, Connie L.; Sobko, Heather; Ray, Midge N.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Ford, Daniel E; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Houston, Thomas K.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 45, No. 5, 11.2013, p. 543-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coley, HL, Sadasivam, RS, Williams, JH, Volkman, JE, Schoenberger, YM, Kohler, CL, Sobko, H, Ray, MN, Allison, JJ, Ford, DE, Gilbert, GH & Houston, TK 2013, 'Crowdsourced peer-versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 543-550. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.004
Coley HL, Sadasivam RS, Williams JH, Volkman JE, Schoenberger YM, Kohler CL et al. Crowdsourced peer-versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2013 Nov;45(5):543-550. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.004
Coley, Heather L. ; Sadasivam, Rajani S. ; Williams, Jessica H. ; Volkman, Julie E. ; Schoenberger, Yu Mei ; Kohler, Connie L. ; Sobko, Heather ; Ray, Midge N. ; Allison, Jeroan J. ; Ford, Daniel E ; Gilbert, Gregg H. ; Houston, Thomas K. / Crowdsourced peer-versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 543-550.
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