Cross sectional study of factors associated to self-reported blood-borne infections among drug users

Juliana Reyes-Urueña, M. Teresa Brugal, Xavier Majo, Antonia Domingo-Salvany, Joan A. Caylà

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The study's aim was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), and to describe their associated risk factors in a population of users of illicit drugs recruited in Catalonia- Spain, during 2012. Methods: Cross-sectional study. People with illicit drugs use were selected in three different types of healthcare centres. The questionnaire was a piloted, structured ad hoc instrument. An analysis was made to identify factors associated to self-reported HCV, HIV and co-infection. Correlates of reported infections were determined using univariate and multivariate Poisson regression (with robust variance). Results: Among 512 participants, 39.65 % self-reported positive serostatus for HCV and 14.84 % for HIV, co-infection was reported by 13.48 %. Among the 224 injecting drug users (IDUs), 187 (83.48 %), 68 (30.36 %) and 66 (29.46 %) reported being positive for HCV, HIV and co-infection, respectively. A higher proportion of HIV-infected cases was observed among women, (18.33 % vs. 13.78 % in men). Prevalence of HCV, HIV and co-infection were higher among participants with early onset of drug consumption, long periods of drug injection or who were unemployed. A positive serostatus was self-reported by 21(7.34 %) participants who did not report any injection; among them 16 and eight, reported being positive for HCV and HIV, respectively; three reported co-infection. Only two people declared exchanging sex for money. For those that reported a negative test, the median time since the last HIV test was 11.41 months (inter-quartile range (IQR) 4-12) and for the HCV test was 4.5 months (IQR 2-7). Conclusions: Among drug users in Catalonia, HIV, HCV and co-infection prevalence are still a big issue especially among IDUs. Women and drug users who have never injected drugs are groups with a significant risk of infection; this might be related to their high-risk behaviours and to being unaware of their serological status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBMC Public Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 13 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drug Users
Hepacivirus
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV
Coinfection
Virus Diseases
Infection
Street Drugs
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Injections
Risk-Taking
Spain
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Keywords

  • Drug users
  • Hepatitis
  • HIV
  • Illicit drugs
  • Risk Factors
  • Spain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Reyes-Urueña, J., Brugal, M. T., Majo, X., Domingo-Salvany, A., & Caylà, J. A. (Accepted/In press). Cross sectional study of factors associated to self-reported blood-borne infections among drug users. BMC Public Health. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-2442-6

Cross sectional study of factors associated to self-reported blood-borne infections among drug users. / Reyes-Urueña, Juliana; Brugal, M. Teresa; Majo, Xavier; Domingo-Salvany, Antonia; Caylà, Joan A.

In: BMC Public Health, 13.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reyes-Urueña, Juliana ; Brugal, M. Teresa ; Majo, Xavier ; Domingo-Salvany, Antonia ; Caylà, Joan A. / Cross sectional study of factors associated to self-reported blood-borne infections among drug users. In: BMC Public Health. 2015.
@article{6f1d79d926634b0b914dee53d28e2ba1,
title = "Cross sectional study of factors associated to self-reported blood-borne infections among drug users",
abstract = "Background: The study's aim was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), and to describe their associated risk factors in a population of users of illicit drugs recruited in Catalonia- Spain, during 2012. Methods: Cross-sectional study. People with illicit drugs use were selected in three different types of healthcare centres. The questionnaire was a piloted, structured ad hoc instrument. An analysis was made to identify factors associated to self-reported HCV, HIV and co-infection. Correlates of reported infections were determined using univariate and multivariate Poisson regression (with robust variance). Results: Among 512 participants, 39.65 {\%} self-reported positive serostatus for HCV and 14.84 {\%} for HIV, co-infection was reported by 13.48 {\%}. Among the 224 injecting drug users (IDUs), 187 (83.48 {\%}), 68 (30.36 {\%}) and 66 (29.46 {\%}) reported being positive for HCV, HIV and co-infection, respectively. A higher proportion of HIV-infected cases was observed among women, (18.33 {\%} vs. 13.78 {\%} in men). Prevalence of HCV, HIV and co-infection were higher among participants with early onset of drug consumption, long periods of drug injection or who were unemployed. A positive serostatus was self-reported by 21(7.34 {\%}) participants who did not report any injection; among them 16 and eight, reported being positive for HCV and HIV, respectively; three reported co-infection. Only two people declared exchanging sex for money. For those that reported a negative test, the median time since the last HIV test was 11.41 months (inter-quartile range (IQR) 4-12) and for the HCV test was 4.5 months (IQR 2-7). Conclusions: Among drug users in Catalonia, HIV, HCV and co-infection prevalence are still a big issue especially among IDUs. Women and drug users who have never injected drugs are groups with a significant risk of infection; this might be related to their high-risk behaviours and to being unaware of their serological status.",
keywords = "Drug users, Hepatitis, HIV, Illicit drugs, Risk Factors, Spain",
author = "Juliana Reyes-Urue{\~n}a and Brugal, {M. Teresa} and Xavier Majo and Antonia Domingo-Salvany and Cayl{\`a}, {Joan A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-015-2442-6",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross sectional study of factors associated to self-reported blood-borne infections among drug users

AU - Reyes-Urueña, Juliana

AU - Brugal, M. Teresa

AU - Majo, Xavier

AU - Domingo-Salvany, Antonia

AU - Caylà, Joan A.

PY - 2015/11/13

Y1 - 2015/11/13

N2 - Background: The study's aim was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), and to describe their associated risk factors in a population of users of illicit drugs recruited in Catalonia- Spain, during 2012. Methods: Cross-sectional study. People with illicit drugs use were selected in three different types of healthcare centres. The questionnaire was a piloted, structured ad hoc instrument. An analysis was made to identify factors associated to self-reported HCV, HIV and co-infection. Correlates of reported infections were determined using univariate and multivariate Poisson regression (with robust variance). Results: Among 512 participants, 39.65 % self-reported positive serostatus for HCV and 14.84 % for HIV, co-infection was reported by 13.48 %. Among the 224 injecting drug users (IDUs), 187 (83.48 %), 68 (30.36 %) and 66 (29.46 %) reported being positive for HCV, HIV and co-infection, respectively. A higher proportion of HIV-infected cases was observed among women, (18.33 % vs. 13.78 % in men). Prevalence of HCV, HIV and co-infection were higher among participants with early onset of drug consumption, long periods of drug injection or who were unemployed. A positive serostatus was self-reported by 21(7.34 %) participants who did not report any injection; among them 16 and eight, reported being positive for HCV and HIV, respectively; three reported co-infection. Only two people declared exchanging sex for money. For those that reported a negative test, the median time since the last HIV test was 11.41 months (inter-quartile range (IQR) 4-12) and for the HCV test was 4.5 months (IQR 2-7). Conclusions: Among drug users in Catalonia, HIV, HCV and co-infection prevalence are still a big issue especially among IDUs. Women and drug users who have never injected drugs are groups with a significant risk of infection; this might be related to their high-risk behaviours and to being unaware of their serological status.

AB - Background: The study's aim was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), and to describe their associated risk factors in a population of users of illicit drugs recruited in Catalonia- Spain, during 2012. Methods: Cross-sectional study. People with illicit drugs use were selected in three different types of healthcare centres. The questionnaire was a piloted, structured ad hoc instrument. An analysis was made to identify factors associated to self-reported HCV, HIV and co-infection. Correlates of reported infections were determined using univariate and multivariate Poisson regression (with robust variance). Results: Among 512 participants, 39.65 % self-reported positive serostatus for HCV and 14.84 % for HIV, co-infection was reported by 13.48 %. Among the 224 injecting drug users (IDUs), 187 (83.48 %), 68 (30.36 %) and 66 (29.46 %) reported being positive for HCV, HIV and co-infection, respectively. A higher proportion of HIV-infected cases was observed among women, (18.33 % vs. 13.78 % in men). Prevalence of HCV, HIV and co-infection were higher among participants with early onset of drug consumption, long periods of drug injection or who were unemployed. A positive serostatus was self-reported by 21(7.34 %) participants who did not report any injection; among them 16 and eight, reported being positive for HCV and HIV, respectively; three reported co-infection. Only two people declared exchanging sex for money. For those that reported a negative test, the median time since the last HIV test was 11.41 months (inter-quartile range (IQR) 4-12) and for the HCV test was 4.5 months (IQR 2-7). Conclusions: Among drug users in Catalonia, HIV, HCV and co-infection prevalence are still a big issue especially among IDUs. Women and drug users who have never injected drugs are groups with a significant risk of infection; this might be related to their high-risk behaviours and to being unaware of their serological status.

KW - Drug users

KW - Hepatitis

KW - HIV

KW - Illicit drugs

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Spain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84946782403&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84946782403&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-015-2442-6

DO - 10.1186/s12889-015-2442-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 26566634

AN - SCOPUS:84946782403

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

ER -