Cross-sectional association of volume, blood pressures, and aortic stiffness with left ventricular mass in incident hemodialysis patients: the Predictors of Arrhythmic and Cardiovascular Risk in End-Stage Renal Disease (PACE) study

Esther D. Kim, Stephen M. Sozio, Michelle M. Estrella, Bernard G. Jaar, Tariq Shafi, Lucy A. Meoni, Wen Hong Linda Kao, Joao A.C. Lima, Rulan S. Parekh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract Background: Higher left ventricular mass (LV) strongly predicts cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients. Although several parameters of preload and afterload have been associated with higher LV mass, whether these parameters independently predict LV mass, remains unclear. Methods: This study examined a cohort of 391 adults with incident hemodialysis enrolled in the Predictors of Arrhythmic and Cardiovascular Risk in End Stage Renal Disease (PACE) study. The main exposures were systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), pulse pressure, arterial stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV), volume status estimated by pulmonary pressures using echocardiogram and intradialytic weight gain. The primary outcome was baseline left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Results: Each systolic, diastolic blood, and pulse pressure measurement was significantly associated with LVMI by linear regression regardless of dialysis unit BP or non-dialysis day BP measurements. Adjusting for cardiovascular confounders, every 10 mmHg increase in systolic or diastolic BP was significantly associated with higher LVMI (SBP β = 7.26, 95 % CI: 4.30, 10.23; DBP β = 10.05, 95 % CI: 5.06, 15.04), and increased pulse pressure was also associated with higher LVMI (β = 0.71, 95 % CI: 0.29, 1.13). Intradialytic weight gain was also associated with higher LVMI but attenuated effects after adjustment (β = 3.25, 95 % CI: 0.67, 5.83). PWV and pulmonary pressures were not associated with LVMI after multivariable adjustment (β = 0.19, 95 % CI: -1.14, 1.79; and β = 0.10, 95 % CI: -0.51, 0.70, respectively). Simultaneously adjusting for all main exposures demonstrated that higher BP was independently associated with higher LVMI (SBP β = 5.64, 95 % CI: 2.78, 8.49; DBP β = 7.29, 95 % CI: 2.26, 12.31, for every 10 mmHg increase in BP). Conclusions: Among a younger and incident hemodialysis population, higher systolic, diastolic, or pulse pressure, regardless of timing with dialysis, is most associated with higher LV mass. Future studies should consider the use of various BP measures in examining the impact of BP on LVM and cardiovascular disease. Findings from such studies could suggest that high BP should be more aggressively treated to promote LVH regression in incident hemodialysis patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number131
JournalBMC nephrology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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