Cross-sectional and longitudinal growth patterns in osteogenesis imperfecta: Implications for clinical care

Emily L. Germain-Lee, Feng Shu Brennen, Diana Stern, Aditi Kantipuly, Pamela Melvin, Mia S. Terkowitz, Jay Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:There is strikingly limited information on linear growth and weight in the different types of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Here, we define growth patterns further with the intent of implementing appropriate adaptations proactively.Methods:We report cross-sectional anthropometric data for 343 subjects with different OI types (144 children, 199 adults). Longitudinal height data for 36 children (18 girls, 18 boys) with OI type I and 10 children (8 girls, 2 boys) with OI type III were obtained.Results:In all cases, the height Z-scores were negatively impacted, and final height Z-scores were impacted the most. In type I, the growth velocities taper near puberty, and there is a blunted pubertal growth spurt. The growth velocities of children with type III decelerate before age 5 y; poor growth continues without an obvious pubertal growth spurt. Obesity is a concern for all patients with OI, with type III patients being the most affected.Conclusion:The linear growth patterns, in addition to the marked increase in weight over time, indicate a need for lifestyle modifications early in childhood, especially a need for weight control. Further definition of the anthropometric measures in OI enables patients to begin modifications as early as possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-495
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Osteogenesis Imperfecta
Growth
Weights and Measures
Puberty
Life Style
Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Germain-Lee, E. L., Brennen, F. S., Stern, D., Kantipuly, A., Melvin, P., Terkowitz, M. S., & Shapiro, J. (2016). Cross-sectional and longitudinal growth patterns in osteogenesis imperfecta: Implications for clinical care. Pediatric Research, 79(3), 489-495. https://doi.org/10.1038/pr.2015.230

Cross-sectional and longitudinal growth patterns in osteogenesis imperfecta : Implications for clinical care. / Germain-Lee, Emily L.; Brennen, Feng Shu; Stern, Diana; Kantipuly, Aditi; Melvin, Pamela; Terkowitz, Mia S.; Shapiro, Jay.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 79, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 489-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Germain-Lee, EL, Brennen, FS, Stern, D, Kantipuly, A, Melvin, P, Terkowitz, MS & Shapiro, J 2016, 'Cross-sectional and longitudinal growth patterns in osteogenesis imperfecta: Implications for clinical care', Pediatric Research, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 489-495. https://doi.org/10.1038/pr.2015.230
Germain-Lee EL, Brennen FS, Stern D, Kantipuly A, Melvin P, Terkowitz MS et al. Cross-sectional and longitudinal growth patterns in osteogenesis imperfecta: Implications for clinical care. Pediatric Research. 2016 Mar 1;79(3):489-495. https://doi.org/10.1038/pr.2015.230
Germain-Lee, Emily L. ; Brennen, Feng Shu ; Stern, Diana ; Kantipuly, Aditi ; Melvin, Pamela ; Terkowitz, Mia S. ; Shapiro, Jay. / Cross-sectional and longitudinal growth patterns in osteogenesis imperfecta : Implications for clinical care. In: Pediatric Research. 2016 ; Vol. 79, No. 3. pp. 489-495.
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