Criteria for assessing cutaneous anergy in women with or at risk for HIV infection

Robert S. Klein, Timothy Flanigan, Paula Schuman, Dawn Smith, David Vlahov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background: Controversy exists about both the clinical utility of anergy testing and the optimal criteria for defining anergy. Objective: We sought to assess various definitions of cutaneous anergy for ability to distinguish HIV status, level of immunodeficiency, and ability to mount a tuberculin reaction among women with or at risk for HIV infection. Methods: HIV-seropositive (n = 721) and HIV-seronegative (n = 358) at-risk women at academic medical centers in Baltimore, Detroit, New York, and Providence had cutaneous testing with mumps, Candida, tetanus toxoid, and tuberculin antigens. Associations with HIV status and CD4+ lymphocyte levels were analyzed. Results: Candida, mumps, and tetanus antigens alone or in combination elicited reactions significantly less often in HIV-seropositive than in HIV-seronegative women and less often in seropositive women with lower CD4+ counts, regardless of induration cutpoint chosen to define a positive reaction. The best antigen combinations for distinguishing groups included tetanus and mumps. Some women nonreactive to the 3 antigens ('anergie') had positive tuberculin reactions among both seropositive subjects (range, 1.1% to 2.9% depending on induration cutpoint for defining anergy) and seronegative subjects (range, 8.9% to 14%). Conclusion: Absence of reactions to Candida, mumps, and tetanus antigens alone or in combination and at any induration cutpoint is associated with HIV status and with CD4+ level. Combinations, including tetanus and thumps antigens with an induration cutpoint of less than 2 mm, may be the best for defining anergy.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)93-98
    Number of pages6
    JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
    Volume103
    Issue number1 I
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1999

    Fingerprint

    HIV Infections
    HIV
    Mumps
    Tetanus
    Skin
    Antigens
    Tuberculin
    Candida
    Baltimore
    Tetanus Toxoid
    CD4 Lymphocyte Count
    Lymphocytes

    Keywords

    • Anergy
    • Cellular immunity
    • Delayed hypersensitivity
    • Skin tests

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Immunology

    Cite this

    Criteria for assessing cutaneous anergy in women with or at risk for HIV infection. / Klein, Robert S.; Flanigan, Timothy; Schuman, Paula; Smith, Dawn; Vlahov, David.

    In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 103, No. 1 I, 1999, p. 93-98.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Klein, Robert S. ; Flanigan, Timothy ; Schuman, Paula ; Smith, Dawn ; Vlahov, David. / Criteria for assessing cutaneous anergy in women with or at risk for HIV infection. In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1999 ; Vol. 103, No. 1 I. pp. 93-98.
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