Criminal justice system involvement and food insufficiency: findings from the 2018 New York City Community Health Survey

Alexander Testa, Dylan B. Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To assess whether personal and family history of criminal justice (CRJ) involvement is related to food insufficiency. Methods: Data are from the 2018 New York City Community Health Survey (n = 9580). Cross-sectional multinomial logistic regression was used to analyze the association between CRJ involvement and food insufficiency. Results: Personal (relative risk ratio= 2.019, 95% confidence interval = 1.363, 2.994) and family history (relative risk ratios = 1.447, 95% confidence interval = 1.014, 2.066) of CRJ involvement is associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing moderate-to-severe food insufficiency, net of covariate for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Conclusion: Developing interventions such as expanding access to nutrition assistance programs for criminal justice involved populations may yield benefits for alleviating food insufficiency and promoting greater health equity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-45
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of epidemiology
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Criminal justice involvement
  • Food insecurity
  • Health
  • Incarceration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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