Cranial volume, mild cognitive deficits, and functional limitations associated with diabetes in a community sample

Andrea L. Christman, Tracy Vannorsdall, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Felicia Hill-Briggs, David Schretlen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diabetes is associated with dementia in older adults, but it remains unclear whether nondemented adults with type 2 diabetes show subtle abnormalities across cognition, neuroanatomy, and everyday functioning. Using the Aging, Brain Imaging, and Cognition study sample of 301 community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults, we conducted a secondary analysis on 28 participants with and 150 participants without diabetes. We analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging data, cognitive test performance, and informant ratings of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (PADL/IADL). Relative to controls, participants with diabetes had lower brain-to-intracranial volume ratios (69.3 ± 4.5% vs. 71.7 ± 4.6%; p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-59
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Cognition
Independent Living
Neuroanatomy
Brain
Activities of Daily Living
Neuroimaging
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Dementia
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Cognition
  • Diabetes
  • Endocrine disorders
  • Function
  • MRI
  • Neuropsychological testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

@article{271bfe7e665b4b27bc8c2e63c6c4cfe7,
title = "Cranial volume, mild cognitive deficits, and functional limitations associated with diabetes in a community sample",
abstract = "Diabetes is associated with dementia in older adults, but it remains unclear whether nondemented adults with type 2 diabetes show subtle abnormalities across cognition, neuroanatomy, and everyday functioning. Using the Aging, Brain Imaging, and Cognition study sample of 301 community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults, we conducted a secondary analysis on 28 participants with and 150 participants without diabetes. We analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging data, cognitive test performance, and informant ratings of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (PADL/IADL). Relative to controls, participants with diabetes had lower brain-to-intracranial volume ratios (69.3 ± 4.5{\%} vs. 71.7 ± 4.6{\%}; p",
keywords = "Behavior, Cognition, Diabetes, Endocrine disorders, Function, MRI, Neuropsychological testing",
author = "Christman, {Andrea L.} and Tracy Vannorsdall and Pearlson, {Godfrey D.} and Felicia Hill-Briggs and David Schretlen",
year = "2010",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1093/arclin/acp091",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "49--59",
journal = "Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology",
issn = "0887-6177",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cranial volume, mild cognitive deficits, and functional limitations associated with diabetes in a community sample

AU - Christman, Andrea L.

AU - Vannorsdall, Tracy

AU - Pearlson, Godfrey D.

AU - Hill-Briggs, Felicia

AU - Schretlen, David

PY - 2010/2

Y1 - 2010/2

N2 - Diabetes is associated with dementia in older adults, but it remains unclear whether nondemented adults with type 2 diabetes show subtle abnormalities across cognition, neuroanatomy, and everyday functioning. Using the Aging, Brain Imaging, and Cognition study sample of 301 community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults, we conducted a secondary analysis on 28 participants with and 150 participants without diabetes. We analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging data, cognitive test performance, and informant ratings of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (PADL/IADL). Relative to controls, participants with diabetes had lower brain-to-intracranial volume ratios (69.3 ± 4.5% vs. 71.7 ± 4.6%; p

AB - Diabetes is associated with dementia in older adults, but it remains unclear whether nondemented adults with type 2 diabetes show subtle abnormalities across cognition, neuroanatomy, and everyday functioning. Using the Aging, Brain Imaging, and Cognition study sample of 301 community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults, we conducted a secondary analysis on 28 participants with and 150 participants without diabetes. We analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging data, cognitive test performance, and informant ratings of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (PADL/IADL). Relative to controls, participants with diabetes had lower brain-to-intracranial volume ratios (69.3 ± 4.5% vs. 71.7 ± 4.6%; p

KW - Behavior

KW - Cognition

KW - Diabetes

KW - Endocrine disorders

KW - Function

KW - MRI

KW - Neuropsychological testing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=76149090198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=76149090198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/arclin/acp091

DO - 10.1093/arclin/acp091

M3 - Article

C2 - 19942595

AN - SCOPUS:76149090198

VL - 25

SP - 49

EP - 59

JO - Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

JF - Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

SN - 0887-6177

IS - 1

ER -