Cranial volume, mild cognitive deficits, and functional limitations associated with diabetes in a community sample

Andrea L. Christman, Tracy D. Vannorsdall, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Felicia Hill-Briggs, David J. Schretlen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diabetes is associated with dementia in older adults, but it remains unclear whether nondemented adults with type 2 diabetes show subtle abnormalities across cognition, neuroanatomy, and everyday functioning. Using the Aging, Brain Imaging, and Cognition study sample of 301 community-dwelling, middle-aged and older adults, we conducted a secondary analysis on 28 participants with and 150 participants without diabetes. We analyzed brain magnetic resonance imaging data, cognitive test performance, and informant ratings of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (PADL/IADL). Relative to controls, participants with diabetes had lower brain-to-intracranial volume ratios (69.3 ± 4.5% vs. 71.7 ± 4.6%; p <. 02), and performed more poorly on measures of working memory, processing speed, fluency, and crystallized intelligence (all p <.05). Decrements in working memory and processing speed were associated with IADL limitations (p <. 01). Nondemented adults with diabetes exhibit neuroanatomic and cognitive abnormalities. Their cognitive deficits correlate with everyday functional limitations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-59
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

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Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Cognition
  • Diabetes
  • Endocrine disorders
  • Function
  • MRI
  • Neuropsychological testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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