CPR Instruction in U.S. High Schools: What Is the State in the Nation?

Lorrel E. Brown, Carlos Lynes, Travis Carroll, Henry Halperin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in high schools is required by law in the majority of U.S. states. However, laws differ from state to state, and it is unknown how this legislation is being enacted. The authors sent a cross-sectional, closed survey to educational superintendents in 32 states with CPR laws in June 2016. The authors subsequently performed direct examination and categorization of CPR legislation in 39 states (several states passed legislation as of September 2017). Survey results indicated differing practices with regard to CPR instruction in areas such as course content (63% perform automated external defibrillator training), instructor (47% used CPR-certified teachers/coaches, 30% used other CPR-certified instructors, 11% used noncertified teachers/coaches), and method (7% followed American Red Cross methods, 55% followed American Heart Association methods). CPR laws differ, although almost all (97%) require hands-on training. Although hands-on practice during CPR instruction in high school is required by law in the majority of U.S. states, there is currently no standardized method of implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2688-2695
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume70
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2017

Keywords

  • CPR in high schools
  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • legislation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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