Covert neurological symptoms associated with silent infarcts from midlife to older age: The atherosclerosis risk in communities study

Beverly G. Windham, Michael E. Griswold, Dean Shibata, Alan Penman, Diane J. Catellier, Thomas H. Mosley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Purpose-Unrecognized or unreported stroke-like symptoms, called covert symptoms, occur in persons free of clinical stroke. Whether covert symptoms are associated with subclinical brain infarcts (SBIs) is unknown. This study examined the association between covert stroke-like symptoms and SBI/stroke in persons with no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack. Methods-A total of 1881 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) participants free of clinical stroke or transient ischemic attack (40% male, 50% black, 47-70 years) were queried for covert symptoms and underwent cerebral MRI during the baseline MRI visit. Symptoms were reassessed after 3 years at Visit 4 (n=1001; 39% male, 50% black) and approximately 10 years with a follow-up MRI (n=1006; 40% male, 50% black, 61-83 years). Results-Covert symptoms were associated with prevalent SBI (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.21-3.11; P=0.006). No support was found for associations between baseline MRI symptoms and SBI at the follow up MRI visit. In participants without SBI at baseline, symptoms at Visit 4 (OR, 2.96; 1.23-7.13; P=0.016) and symptoms at the follow-up MRI visit (OR, 4.29; 2.51-7.33; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1218-1223
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain imaging
  • Epidemiology
  • Lacunar infarcts
  • Subclinical brain infarcts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Covert neurological symptoms associated with silent infarcts from midlife to older age: The atherosclerosis risk in communities study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this