Couples’ Economic Equilibrium, Gender Norms and Intimate Partner Violence in Kirumba, Tanzania

Karima Manji, Lori Heise, Beniamino Cislaghi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the link between the loss of men’s status as breadwinners and their use of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Kirumba (Mwanza city, Tanzania), mediated by the entry of women into the cash work force. Using qualitative data from 20 in-depth interviews and eight focus groups with men (n = 58) and women (n = 58), this article explores how the existing gender-related social norm linked to male breadwinning was threatened when women were forced to enter into paid work (linked to the family’s impoverishment), and how these changes eventually increased partner violence. The study draws implications for IPV reduction strategies in patriarchal contexts experiencing declining economic opportunities for men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2062-2082
Number of pages21
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume26
Issue number15-16
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

Keywords

  • Tanzania
  • gender norms
  • intimate partner violence
  • qualitative research
  • women’s income generation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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