Could salicylates in food have contributed to the decline in cardiovascular disease mortality? A new hypothesis

Lillian May Ingster, Manning Feinleib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. The prophylactic effect of aspirin (at 80 mg/day) for the prevention of cardiovascular disease mortality has long been recognized. This study examined whether other salicylates are present in comparable quantities in the US food supply. Methods. To estimate the order of magnitude for salicylates in the food supply, annual production data for selected synthetic salicylates were analyzed. Results. Production figures for 1960 indicate exposure to salicylates of 259 mg/day per person, or 95 mg/day per person excluding aspirin. Trend data indicate a rise in the production of salicylates over time, reaching 341 mg/day per person, or 126 mg/day per person excluding aspirin, in 1970. Conclusion. The US ingestion of salicylates with aspirinlike properties may have increased to the point that many susceptible individuals have received a beneficial effect that has contributed to the decline in cardiovascular disease mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1554-1557
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume87
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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