Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating

Frances L. Lynch, Ruth H. Striegel-Moore, John F. Dickerson, Nancy A Perrin, Lynn DeBar, G. Terence Wilson, Helena C. Kraemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Adoption of effective treatments for recurrent binge-eating disorders depends on the balance of costs and benefits. Using data from a recent randomized controlled trial, we conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help intervention (CBT-GSH) to treat recurrent binge eating compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Participants were 123 adult members of an HMO (mean age = 37.2 years, 91.9% female, 96.7% non-Hispanic White) who met criteria for eating disorders involving binge eating as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination (C. G. Fairburn & Z. Cooper, 1993). Participants were randomized either to treatment as usual (TAU) or to TAU plus CBT-GSH. The clinical outcomes were binge-free days and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs); total societal cost was estimated using costs to patients and the health plan and related costs. Results: Compared to those receiving TAU only, those who received TAU plus CBT-GSH experienced 25.2 more binge-free days and had lower total societal costs of $427 over 12 months following the intervention (incremental CEA ratio of -$20.23 per binge-free day or -$26,847 per QALY). Lower costs in the TAU plus CBT-GSH group were due to reduced use of TAU services in that group, resulting in lower net costs for the TAU plus CBT group despite the additional cost of CBT-GSH. Conclusions: Findings support CBT-GSH dissemination for recurrent binge-eating treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-333
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bulimia
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cognitive Therapy
Binge-Eating Disorder
Costs and Cost Analysis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Therapeutics
Health Care Costs
Health Maintenance Organizations
Self-Help Groups
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health

Keywords

  • binge eating
  • cognitive behavior therapy
  • cost-effectiveness analysis
  • evidence-based treatment programs
  • guided self-help

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Lynch, F. L., Striegel-Moore, R. H., Dickerson, J. F., Perrin, N. A., DeBar, L., Wilson, G. T., & Kraemer, H. C. (2010). Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78(3), 322-333. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0018982

Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating. / Lynch, Frances L.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Dickerson, John F.; Perrin, Nancy A; DeBar, Lynn; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 78, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 322-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lynch, FL, Striegel-Moore, RH, Dickerson, JF, Perrin, NA, DeBar, L, Wilson, GT & Kraemer, HC 2010, 'Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 322-333. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0018982
Lynch, Frances L. ; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H. ; Dickerson, John F. ; Perrin, Nancy A ; DeBar, Lynn ; Wilson, G. Terence ; Kraemer, Helena C. / Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2010 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 322-333.
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