Cost-effectiveness of CRAG-LFA screening for cryptococcal meningitis among people living with HIV in Uganda

Anu Ramachandran, Yukari Manabe, Radha Rajasingham, Maunank Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) constitutes a significant source of mortality in resource-limited regions. Cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) can be detected in the blood before onset of meningitis. We sought to determine the cost-effectiveness of implementing CRAG screening using the recently developed CRAG lateral flow assay in Uganda compared to current practice without screening.

METHODS: A decision-analytic model was constructed to compare two strategies for cryptococcal prevention among people living with HIV with CD4 < 100 in Uganda: No cryptococcal screening vs. CRAG screening with WHO-recommended preemptive treatment for CRAG-positive patients. The model was constructed to reflect primary HIV clinics in Uganda, with a cohort of HIV-infected patients with CD4 < 100 cells/uL. Primary outcomes were expected costs, DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). We evaluated varying levels of programmatic implementation in secondary analysis.

RESULTS: CRAG screening was considered highly cost-effective and was associated with an ICER of $6.14 per DALY averted compared to no screening (95% uncertainty range: $-20.32 to $36.47). Overall, implementation of CRAG screening was projected to cost $1.52 more per person, and was projected to result in a 40% relative reduction in cryptococcal-associated mortality. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, CRAG screening was cost-effective in 100% of scenarios and cost saving (ie cheaper and more effective than no screening) in 30% of scenarios. Secondary analysis projected a total cost of $651,454 for 100% implementation of screening nationally, while averting 1228 deaths compared to no screening.

CONCLUSION: CRAG screening for PLWH with low CD4 represents excellent value for money with the potential to prevent cryptococcal morbidity and mortality in Uganda.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225
Number of pages1
JournalBMC infectious diseases
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2017

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Cryptococcal Meningitis
Uganda
Cost-Benefit Analysis
HIV
Antigens
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Meningitis
Uncertainty
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Cost-effectiveness of CRAG-LFA screening for cryptococcal meningitis among people living with HIV in Uganda. / Ramachandran, Anu; Manabe, Yukari; Rajasingham, Radha; Shah, Maunank.

In: BMC infectious diseases, Vol. 17, No. 1, 23.03.2017, p. 225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ramachandran, Anu; Manabe, Yukari; Rajasingham, Radha; Shah, Maunank / Cost-effectiveness of CRAG-LFA screening for cryptococcal meningitis among people living with HIV in Uganda.

In: BMC infectious diseases, Vol. 17, No. 1, 23.03.2017, p. 225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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