Cost-effective therapeutic hypothermia treatment device for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

John J. Kim, Nathan Buchbinder, Simon Ammanuel, Robert Kim, Erika Moore, Neil O'Donnell, Jennifer Lee-Summers, Ewa Kulikowicz, Soumyadipta Acharya, Robert Allen, Ryan W. Lee, Michael V Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite recent advances in neonatal care and monitoring, asphyxia globally accounts for 23% of the 4 million annual deaths of newborns, and leads to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Occurring in five of 1000 live-born infants globally and even more in developing countries, HIE is a serious problem that causes death in 25%-50% of affected neonates and neurological disability to at least 25% of survivors. In order to prevent the damage caused by HIE, our invention provides an effective whole-body cooling of the neonates by utilizing evaporation and an endothermic reaction. Our device is composed of basic electronics, clay pots, sand, and urea-based instant cold pack powder. A larger clay pot, lined with nearly 5 cm of sand, contains a smaller pot, where the neonate will be placed for therapeutic treatment. When the sand is mixed with instant cold pack urea powder and wetted with water, the device can extract heat from inside to outside and maintain the inner pot at 17°C for more than 24 hours with monitoring by LED lights and thermistors. Using a piglet model, we confirmed that our device fits the specific parameters of therapeutic hypothermia, lowering the body temperature to 33.5°C with a 1°C margin of error. After the therapeutic hypothermia treatment, warming is regulated by adjusting the amount of water added and the location of baby inside the device. Our invention uniquely limits the amount of electricity required to power and operate the device compared with current expensive and high-tech devices available in the United States. Our device costs a maximum of 40 dollars and is simple enough to be used in neonatal intensive care units in developing countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedical Devices: Evidence and Research
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 31 2012

Fingerprint

Hypothermia
Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia
Induced Hypothermia
Sand
Patents and inventions
Developing countries
Costs and Cost Analysis
Urea
Equipment and Supplies
Clay
Costs
Powders
Intensive care units
Newborn Infant
Thermistors
Monitoring
Light emitting diodes
Water
Evaporation
Electronic equipment

Keywords

  • Birth asphyxia
  • Evaporative cooling
  • Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy
  • Neuroprotection
  • Therapeutic hypothermia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Cost-effective therapeutic hypothermia treatment device for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. / Kim, John J.; Buchbinder, Nathan; Ammanuel, Simon; Kim, Robert; Moore, Erika; O'Donnell, Neil; Lee-Summers, Jennifer; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Allen, Robert; Lee, Ryan W.; Johnston, Michael V.

In: Medical Devices: Evidence and Research, Vol. 6, No. 1, 31.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim JJ, Buchbinder N, Ammanuel S, Kim R, Moore E, O'Donnell N et al. Cost-effective therapeutic hypothermia treatment device for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Medical Devices: Evidence and Research. 2012 Dec 31;6(1).
Kim, John J. ; Buchbinder, Nathan ; Ammanuel, Simon ; Kim, Robert ; Moore, Erika ; O'Donnell, Neil ; Lee-Summers, Jennifer ; Kulikowicz, Ewa ; Acharya, Soumyadipta ; Allen, Robert ; Lee, Ryan W. ; Johnston, Michael V. / Cost-effective therapeutic hypothermia treatment device for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. In: Medical Devices: Evidence and Research. 2012 ; Vol. 6, No. 1.
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