Cost and Visit Duration of Same-Day Access at an Academic Ophthalmology Department vs Emergency Department

Eric L Singman, Kerry Smith, Radhika Mehta, Michael Boland, Divya Srikumaran, Kevin Frick, Lynne Young, Gina Locco, Jing Tian, Cathy Kowalewski, Peter J McDonnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Importance: Convenient outpatient access for ophthalmology patients seeking urgent care could offer savings compared with an emergency department (ED) visit. Objective: To evaluate the costs and visit durations of same-day access (SDA) in an ophthalmology department at an academic medical center vs ED care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This single-center study was a retrospective quality improvement analysis of an institutional electronic medical record system at the Wilmer Eye Institute clinics and the Johns Hopkins Hospital ED. On June 1, 2015, the Wilmer Eye Institute and Johns Hopkins Hospital initiated an official policy of providing SDA to patients calling for appointments (ie, the same-day project). All ophthalmology clinic locations created same-day appointment slots for at least 1 practitioner. In recognition of seasonal variations in patient visit volumes, the 10 months before implementation (August 1, 2014, to May 31, 2015) were compared with complementary periods in 2015 to 2016 and 2016 to 2017. Main Outcomes and Measures: The study tabulated encounters, charges, and visit length for outpatients seen on the same day or by previously scheduled appointments. For the ED patients, volume, diagnoses, charges, and length of stay data were collected. The numbers of SDA patients who indicated urgency were tabulated. Results: The number of SDA patients increased from 22 781 to 26 579 for the first year after SDA implementation. The mean charge was $258 (95% CI, $250-$266; median, $184; interquartile range [IQR], $175-$320), and the mean clinic transit time was 1.55 hours (95% CI, 1.54-1.57 hours; median, 1.28 hours). For patients seeking eye care in the ED, the mean professional fee was $401 (95% CI, $390-$411; median, $360; IQR, $255-$500), the mean (SD) total hospital charge was $1040 ($999) (95% CI, $729-$1079; median, $1002; IQR, $334-$1429), and the mean length of stay was 7.30 hours (95% CI, 7.01-7.57 hours; median, 7.20 hours). The top 4 ophthalmic diagnoses for ED patients were conjunctivitis, cornea abrasion, iritis, and visual loss, which were unchanged after SDA implementation. In calendar year 2017, a total of 4062 SDA patients reported urgency; their estimated savings in charges compared with an ED visit were $580866 in professional fees and $3176484 in hospital charges. Conclusions and Relevance: Same-day access appears to be less expensive and to require less time in the health care system than a visit to the ED for an ophthalmic diagnosis. Substantial savings in time and money might be achieved if urgent eye care is delivered in the clinic rather than the ED.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJAMA ophthalmology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Ophthalmology
Hospital Emergency Service
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hospital Charges
Appointments and Schedules
Fees and Charges
Ambulatory Care
Length of Stay
Outpatients
Iritis
Conjunctivitis
Electronic Health Records
Hospital Departments
Emergency Medical Services
Quality Improvement
Cornea
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Cost and Visit Duration of Same-Day Access at an Academic Ophthalmology Department vs Emergency Department. / Singman, Eric L; Smith, Kerry; Mehta, Radhika; Boland, Michael; Srikumaran, Divya; Frick, Kevin; Young, Lynne; Locco, Gina; Tian, Jing; Kowalewski, Cathy; McDonnell, Peter J.

In: JAMA ophthalmology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Srikumaran, Divya

AU - Frick, Kevin

AU - Young, Lynne

AU - Locco, Gina

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