Corticofugal modulation of the medial geniculate body

David Kay Ryugo, Norman M. Weinberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The function of corticothalamic projections in the auditory system was investigated by reversible inactivation of primary auditory cortex. Changes in the discharges of multiple-unit "clusters" within the ventral division of the medial geniculate body were assessed following removal of normal descending influences by cortical cooling. Patterns of neuronal discharges to clicks or tones were classified as either reverberatory or nonreverberatory during precool control sessions. Cortical cooling suppressed the late reverberatory discharges of the former, but had no effect on the discharge rate or pattern of the latter. The short-latency (<20 msec) response was unaltered for either type. In addition, cooling of primary auditory cortex produced a significant increase in the background activity of nonreverberatory neurons but had no consistent effects on background activity of reverberatory neurons. Two distinct corticothalamic pathways are postulated to account for these results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-391
Number of pages15
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Geniculate Bodies
Auditory Cortex
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology

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Corticofugal modulation of the medial geniculate body. / Ryugo, David Kay; Weinberger, Norman M.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 51, No. 2, 1976, p. 377-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ryugo, David Kay ; Weinberger, Norman M. / Corticofugal modulation of the medial geniculate body. In: Experimental Neurology. 1976 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 377-391.
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