Cortical systems associated with covert music rehearsal

Frederick J P Langheim, Joseph H. Callicott, Venkata Mattay, Jeff H. Duyn, Daniel Weinberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Musical representation and overt music production are necessarily complex cognitive phenomena. While overt musical performance may be observed and studied, the act of performance itself necessarily skews results toward the importance of primary sensorimotor and auditory cortices. However, imagined musical performance (IMP) represents a complex behavioral task involving components suited to exploring the physiological underpinnings of musical cognition in music performance without the sensorimotor and auditory confounds of overt performance. We mapped the blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI activation response associated with IMP in experienced musicians independent of the piece imagined. IMP consistently activated supplementary motor and premotor areas, right superior parietal lobule, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral mid-frontal gyri, and bilateral lateral cerebellum in contrast with rest, in a manner distinct from fingertapping versus rest and passive listening to the same piece versus rest. These data implicate an associative network independent of primary sensorimotor and auditory activity, likely representing the cortical elements most intimately linked to music production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)901-908
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroImage
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Music
Motor Cortex
Parietal Lobe
Auditory Cortex
Prefrontal Cortex
Cerebellum
Cognition
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • fMRI
  • Imagination
  • Music
  • Parietal
  • Prefrontal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Cortical systems associated with covert music rehearsal. / Langheim, Frederick J P; Callicott, Joseph H.; Mattay, Venkata; Duyn, Jeff H.; Weinberger, Daniel.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 16, No. 4, 08.2002, p. 901-908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Langheim, Frederick J P ; Callicott, Joseph H. ; Mattay, Venkata ; Duyn, Jeff H. ; Weinberger, Daniel. / Cortical systems associated with covert music rehearsal. In: NeuroImage. 2002 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 901-908.
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