Correlation between circulating fungal biomarkers and clinical outcome in invasive aspergillosis

Dionysios Neofytos, Radha Railkar, Kathleen M. Mullane, David N. Fredricks, Bruno Granwehr, Kieren A. Marr, Nikolaos G. Almyroudis, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, Johan Maertens, Rebecca Fox, Cameron Douglas, Robert Iannone, Eunkyung Kauh, Norah Shire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective means are needed to predict and assess clinical response in patients treated for invasive aspergillosis (IA). We examined whether early changes in serum galactomannan (GM) and/or β-D-glucan (BDG) can predict clinical outcomes. Patients with proven or probable IA were prospectively enrolled, and serial GMand BDG levels and GMoptical density indices (GMI) were calculated twice weekly for 6 weeks following initiation of standard-of-care antifungal therapy. Changes in these biomarkers during the first 2 and 6 weeks of treatment were analyzed for associations with clinical response and survival at weeks 6 and 12. Among 47 patients with IA, 53.2%(25/47) and 65.9%(27/41) had clinical response by weeks 6 and 12, respectively. Changes in biomarkers during the first 2 weeks were associated with clinical response at 6 weeks (GMI, P = 0.03) and 12 weeks (GM+BDG composite, P = 0.05; GM, P = 0.04; GMI, P = 0.02). Changes in biomarkers during the first 6 weeks were also associated with clinical response at 6 weeks (GM, P = 0.05;GMI, P = 0.03) and 12 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.02; GM, P = 0.02; GMI, P = 0.01). Overall survival rates at 6 weeks and 12 weeks were 87.2%(41/47) and 79.1% (34/43), respectively. Decreasing biomarkers in the first 2 weeks were associated with survival at 6 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.03; BDG, P = 0.01;GM, P = 0.03) and at 12 weeks (BDG+GM, P = 0.01; BDG, P = 0.03; GM, P = 0.01; GMI, P = 0.007). Similar correlations occurred for biomarkers measured over 6 weeks. Patients with negative baseline GMI and/or persistently negative GMI during the first 2 weeks were more likely to have CR and survival. These results suggest that changes of biomarkers may be informative to predict and/or assess response to therapy and survival in patients treated for IA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere129022
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 24 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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    Neofytos, D., Railkar, R., Mullane, K. M., Fredricks, D. N., Granwehr, B., Marr, K. A., Almyroudis, N. G., Kontoyiannis, D. P., Maertens, J., Fox, R., Douglas, C., Iannone, R., Kauh, E., & Shire, N. (2015). Correlation between circulating fungal biomarkers and clinical outcome in invasive aspergillosis. PloS one, 10(6), [e129022]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0129022