Correlating cognitive decline with white matter lesion and brain atrophy magnetic resonance imaging measurements in Alzheimer's disease

Michel Bilello, Jimit Doshi, S. Ali Nabavizadeh, Jon B. Toledo, Guray Erus, Sharon X. Xie, John Q. Trojanowski, Xiaoyan Han, Christos Davatzikos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:Vascular risk factors are increasingly recognized as risks factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and early conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. While neuroimaging research inADhas focused on brain atrophy, metabolic function, or amyloid deposition, little attention has been paid to the effect of cerebrovascular disease to cognitive decline. Objective: To investigate the correlation of brain atrophy and white matter lesions with cognitive decline in AD, MCI, and control subjects. Methods: Patients with AD and MCI, and healthy subjects were included in this study. Subjects had a baseline MRI scan, and baseline and follow-up neuropsychological battery (CERAD). Regional volumes were measured, and white matter lesion segmentationwas performed. Correlations between rate of CERAD score decline and white matter lesion load and brain structure volume were evaluated. In addition, voxel-based correlations between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy and white matter lesion measures were computed. Results: CERAD rate of decline was most significantly associated with lesion loads located in the fornices. Several temporal lobe ROI volumes were significantly associated with CERAD decline. Voxel-based analysis demonstrated strong correlation between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy measures in the anterior temporal lobes. Correlation of baseline CERAD scores with white matter lesion volumes achieved significance in multilobar subcortical white matter. Conclusion: Both baseline and declines in CERAD scores correlate with white matter lesion load and gray matter atrophy. Results of this study highlight the dominant effect of volume loss, and underscore the importance of small vessel disease as a contributor to cognitive decline in the elderly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-994
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atrophy
Alzheimer Disease
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Temporal Lobe
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Cognitive Dysfunction
White Matter
Amyloid
Neuroimaging
Dementia
Healthy Volunteers
Research

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • atrophy
  • cognitive decline
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • vascular disease
  • white matter lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Correlating cognitive decline with white matter lesion and brain atrophy magnetic resonance imaging measurements in Alzheimer's disease. / Bilello, Michel; Doshi, Jimit; Nabavizadeh, S. Ali; Toledo, Jon B.; Erus, Guray; Xie, Sharon X.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Han, Xiaoyan; Davatzikos, Christos.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 48, No. 4, 27.10.2015, p. 987-994.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bilello, M, Doshi, J, Nabavizadeh, SA, Toledo, JB, Erus, G, Xie, SX, Trojanowski, JQ, Han, X & Davatzikos, C 2015, 'Correlating cognitive decline with white matter lesion and brain atrophy magnetic resonance imaging measurements in Alzheimer's disease', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 987-994. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-150400
Bilello, Michel ; Doshi, Jimit ; Nabavizadeh, S. Ali ; Toledo, Jon B. ; Erus, Guray ; Xie, Sharon X. ; Trojanowski, John Q. ; Han, Xiaoyan ; Davatzikos, Christos. / Correlating cognitive decline with white matter lesion and brain atrophy magnetic resonance imaging measurements in Alzheimer's disease. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2015 ; Vol. 48, No. 4. pp. 987-994.
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AU - Doshi, Jimit

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AU - Toledo, Jon B.

AU - Erus, Guray

AU - Xie, Sharon X.

AU - Trojanowski, John Q.

AU - Han, Xiaoyan

AU - Davatzikos, Christos

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AB - Background:Vascular risk factors are increasingly recognized as risks factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and early conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. While neuroimaging research inADhas focused on brain atrophy, metabolic function, or amyloid deposition, little attention has been paid to the effect of cerebrovascular disease to cognitive decline. Objective: To investigate the correlation of brain atrophy and white matter lesions with cognitive decline in AD, MCI, and control subjects. Methods: Patients with AD and MCI, and healthy subjects were included in this study. Subjects had a baseline MRI scan, and baseline and follow-up neuropsychological battery (CERAD). Regional volumes were measured, and white matter lesion segmentationwas performed. Correlations between rate of CERAD score decline and white matter lesion load and brain structure volume were evaluated. In addition, voxel-based correlations between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy and white matter lesion measures were computed. Results: CERAD rate of decline was most significantly associated with lesion loads located in the fornices. Several temporal lobe ROI volumes were significantly associated with CERAD decline. Voxel-based analysis demonstrated strong correlation between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy measures in the anterior temporal lobes. Correlation of baseline CERAD scores with white matter lesion volumes achieved significance in multilobar subcortical white matter. Conclusion: Both baseline and declines in CERAD scores correlate with white matter lesion load and gray matter atrophy. Results of this study highlight the dominant effect of volume loss, and underscore the importance of small vessel disease as a contributor to cognitive decline in the elderly.

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