Correction: HIV viremia and T-cell activation differentially affect the performance of glomerular filtration rate equations based on creatinine and cystatin C (PLoS One (2013) 8:12 (e82028) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082028)

Bhavna Bhasin, Bryan Lau, Mohamed G. Atta, Derek M. Fine, Michelle M. Estrella, George J. Schwartz, Gregory M. Lucas

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

After publication of this article [1], it came to light that there were errors in the reported glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates. The two-fold purpose of this paper [1] was to 1) compare accuracy and bias of widely used glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations to a gold-standard GFR measure (iohexol disappearance from plasma) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative volunteers, and 2) to assess factors associated with bias and accuracy of the creatinine-based and cystatin C-based equations. Recently, our co-investigators, who performed the laboratory analyses and calculations for the iohexol GFR, identified a drift that occurred in their measurement of iohexol (prior to this study) that led to an across-the-board underestimation of iohexol concentrations from blood samples, which produced a systematic overestimation of GFR by approximately 10%. This measurement error in this laboratory was described in a publication in 2017[2]. We subsequently repeated the analyses in the PLOS ONE paper using recalibrated (corrected) iohexol GFR values provided here in an updated version of Table 1. (Table Presented).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0215630
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Cystatin C
cystatins
glomerular filtration rate
T-cells
Iohexol
Viremia
viremia
Glomerular Filtration Rate
creatinine
Creatinine
T-lymphocytes
Chemical activation
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Publications
Measurement errors
Gold
gold
volunteers
Volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{225b6a572b9f49988f743ec35783ebad,
title = "Correction: HIV viremia and T-cell activation differentially affect the performance of glomerular filtration rate equations based on creatinine and cystatin C (PLoS One (2013) 8:12 (e82028) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082028)",
abstract = "After publication of this article [1], it came to light that there were errors in the reported glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates. The two-fold purpose of this paper [1] was to 1) compare accuracy and bias of widely used glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations to a gold-standard GFR measure (iohexol disappearance from plasma) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative volunteers, and 2) to assess factors associated with bias and accuracy of the creatinine-based and cystatin C-based equations. Recently, our co-investigators, who performed the laboratory analyses and calculations for the iohexol GFR, identified a drift that occurred in their measurement of iohexol (prior to this study) that led to an across-the-board underestimation of iohexol concentrations from blood samples, which produced a systematic overestimation of GFR by approximately 10{\%}. This measurement error in this laboratory was described in a publication in 2017[2]. We subsequently repeated the analyses in the PLOS ONE paper using recalibrated (corrected) iohexol GFR values provided here in an updated version of Table 1. (Table Presented).",
author = "Bhavna Bhasin and Bryan Lau and Atta, {Mohamed G.} and Fine, {Derek M.} and Estrella, {Michelle M.} and Schwartz, {George J.} and Lucas, {Gregory M.}",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Correction

T2 - HIV viremia and T-cell activation differentially affect the performance of glomerular filtration rate equations based on creatinine and cystatin C (PLoS One (2013) 8:12 (e82028) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082028)

AU - Bhasin, Bhavna

AU - Lau, Bryan

AU - Atta, Mohamed G.

AU - Fine, Derek M.

AU - Estrella, Michelle M.

AU - Schwartz, George J.

AU - Lucas, Gregory M.

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - After publication of this article [1], it came to light that there were errors in the reported glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates. The two-fold purpose of this paper [1] was to 1) compare accuracy and bias of widely used glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations to a gold-standard GFR measure (iohexol disappearance from plasma) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative volunteers, and 2) to assess factors associated with bias and accuracy of the creatinine-based and cystatin C-based equations. Recently, our co-investigators, who performed the laboratory analyses and calculations for the iohexol GFR, identified a drift that occurred in their measurement of iohexol (prior to this study) that led to an across-the-board underestimation of iohexol concentrations from blood samples, which produced a systematic overestimation of GFR by approximately 10%. This measurement error in this laboratory was described in a publication in 2017[2]. We subsequently repeated the analyses in the PLOS ONE paper using recalibrated (corrected) iohexol GFR values provided here in an updated version of Table 1. (Table Presented).

AB - After publication of this article [1], it came to light that there were errors in the reported glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates. The two-fold purpose of this paper [1] was to 1) compare accuracy and bias of widely used glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations to a gold-standard GFR measure (iohexol disappearance from plasma) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative volunteers, and 2) to assess factors associated with bias and accuracy of the creatinine-based and cystatin C-based equations. Recently, our co-investigators, who performed the laboratory analyses and calculations for the iohexol GFR, identified a drift that occurred in their measurement of iohexol (prior to this study) that led to an across-the-board underestimation of iohexol concentrations from blood samples, which produced a systematic overestimation of GFR by approximately 10%. This measurement error in this laboratory was described in a publication in 2017[2]. We subsequently repeated the analyses in the PLOS ONE paper using recalibrated (corrected) iohexol GFR values provided here in an updated version of Table 1. (Table Presented).

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