Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: Imaging contrast, sequence, and timing

Reza Nezafat, Yuchi Han, Dana C. Peters, Daniel A. Herzka, John V. Wylie, Beth Goddu, Kraig K. Kissinger, Susan B. Yeon, Peter J. Zimetbaum, Warren J. Manning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recently, there has been increased interest in imaging the coronary vein anatomy to guide interventional cardiovascular procedures such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), a device therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). With CRT the lateral wall of the left ventricle is electrically paced using a transvenous coronary sinus lead or surgically placed epicardial lead. Proper transvenous lead placement is facilitated by the knowledge of the coronary vein anatomy. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) has the potential to image the coronary veins. In this study we propose and test CMR techniques and protocols for imaging the coronary venous anatomy. Three aspects of design of imaging sequence were studied: magnetization preparation schemes (T2 preparation and magnetization transfer), imaging sequences (gradient-echo (GRE) and steady-state free precession (SSFP)), and imaging time during the cardiac cycle. Numerical and in vivo studies both in healthy and CHF subjects were performed to optimize and demonstrate the utility of CMR for coronary vein imaging. Magnetization transfer was superior to T2 preparation for contrast enhancement. Both GRE and SSFP were viable imaging sequences, although GRE provided more robust results with better contrast. Imaging during the end-systolic quiescent period was preferable as it coincided with the maximum size of the coronary veins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1196-1206
Number of pages11
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Keywords

  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Coronary vein imaging
  • Magnetization transfer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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    Nezafat, R., Han, Y., Peters, D. C., Herzka, D. A., Wylie, J. V., Goddu, B., Kissinger, K. K., Yeon, S. B., Zimetbaum, P. J., & Manning, W. J. (2007). Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: Imaging contrast, sequence, and timing. Magnetic resonance in medicine, 58(6), 1196-1206. https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.21395