Cooking fuel type, household ventilation, and the risk of acute lower respiratory illness in urban Bangladeshi children: A longitudinal study

E. L. Murray, L. Brondi, D. Kleinbaum, J. E. McGowan, C. Van Mels, W. A. Brooks, D. Goswami, P. B. Ryan, M. Klein, C. B. Bridges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Acute lower respiratory illnesses (ALRI) are the leading cause of death among children <5years. Studies have found that biomass cooking fuels are an important risk factor for ALRI. However, few studies have evaluated the influence of natural household ventilation indicators on ALRI. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between cooking fuel, natural household ventilation, and ALRI. During October 17, 2004-September 30, 2005, children <5years living in a low-income neighborhood of Dhaka, Bangladesh, were assessed weekly for ALRI and surveyed quarterly about biomass fuel use, electric fan ownership, and natural household ventilation (windows, ventilation grates, and presence of a gap between the wall and ceiling). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations. Six thousand and seventy-nine children <5years enrolled during the study period (99% participation) experienced 1291 ALRI. In the multivariate model, ≥2 windows [OR=0.75, 95% CI=(0.58, 0.96)], ventilation grates [OR=0.80, 95% CI=(0.65, 0.98)], and not owning an electric fan [OR=1.50, 95% CI=(1.21, 1.88)] were associated with ALRI; gap presence and using biomass fuels were not associated with ALRI. Structural factors that might improve household air circulation and exchange were associated with decreased ALRI risk. Improved natural ventilation might reduce ALRI among children in low-income families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-139
Number of pages8
JournalIndoor Air
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute lower respiratory infections
  • Bangladesh
  • Children
  • Cooking fuel
  • Longitudinal study
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cooking fuel type, household ventilation, and the risk of acute lower respiratory illness in urban Bangladeshi children: A longitudinal study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this