Controlled clinical trial of zolpidem for the treatment of insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children 6 to 17 years of age

Jeffrey L. Blumer, Robert L Findling, Weichung Joe Shih, Christina Soubrane, Michael D. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The goal was to evaluate the hypnotic efficacy of zolpidem at 0.25 mg/kg per day (maximum of 10 mg/day), compared with placebo, in children 6 through 17 years of age who were experiencing insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. METHODS. An 8-week, North American, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted. Patients underwent stratification according to age (6-11 years [N = 111] or 12-17 years [N = 90]) and were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the study drug or placebo (in a 2:1 ratio). The primary efficacy variable was latency to persistent sleep between weeks 3 and 6. Secondary efficacy variables also were assessed, and behavioral and cognitive components of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were monitored. Safety was assessed on the basis of reports of adverse events, abnormal laboratory data, vital signs, and physical examination findings. The potential for next-day residual effects also was assessed. RESULTS. The baseline-adjusted mean change in latency to persistent sleep at week 4 did not differ significantly between the zolpidem and placebo groups (-20.28 vs -21.27 minutes). However, differences favoring zolpidem were observed for the older age group in Clinical Global Impression scores at weeks 4 and 8. No next-day residual effects of treatment were associated with zolpidem, and no rebound phenomena occurred after treatment discontinuation. Central nervous system and psychiatric disorders were the most-frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (>5%) that were observed more frequently with zolpidem than with placebo; these included dizziness, headache, and hallucinations. Ten (7.4%) patients discontinued zolpidem treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSION. Zolpidem at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg per day to a maximum of 10 mg failed to reduce the latency to persistent sleep on polysomnographic recordings after 4 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents 6 through 17 years of age who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-associated insomnia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume123
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Controlled Clinical Trials
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Placebos
Sleep
Therapeutics
Vital Signs
Hallucinations
Central Nervous System Diseases
Dizziness
zolpidem
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Physical Examination
Headache
Psychiatry
Age Groups
Safety
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Insomnia
  • Latency to persistent sleep
  • Zolpidem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Controlled clinical trial of zolpidem for the treatment of insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children 6 to 17 years of age. / Blumer, Jeffrey L.; Findling, Robert L; Shih, Weichung Joe; Soubrane, Christina; Reed, Michael D.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 123, No. 5, 05.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE. The goal was to evaluate the hypnotic efficacy of zolpidem at 0.25 mg/kg per day (maximum of 10 mg/day), compared with placebo, in children 6 through 17 years of age who were experiencing insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. METHODS. An 8-week, North American, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted. Patients underwent stratification according to age (6-11 years [N = 111] or 12-17 years [N = 90]) and were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the study drug or placebo (in a 2:1 ratio). The primary efficacy variable was latency to persistent sleep between weeks 3 and 6. Secondary efficacy variables also were assessed, and behavioral and cognitive components of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were monitored. Safety was assessed on the basis of reports of adverse events, abnormal laboratory data, vital signs, and physical examination findings. The potential for next-day residual effects also was assessed. RESULTS. The baseline-adjusted mean change in latency to persistent sleep at week 4 did not differ significantly between the zolpidem and placebo groups (-20.28 vs -21.27 minutes). However, differences favoring zolpidem were observed for the older age group in Clinical Global Impression scores at weeks 4 and 8. No next-day residual effects of treatment were associated with zolpidem, and no rebound phenomena occurred after treatment discontinuation. Central nervous system and psychiatric disorders were the most-frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (>5{\%}) that were observed more frequently with zolpidem than with placebo; these included dizziness, headache, and hallucinations. Ten (7.4{\%}) patients discontinued zolpidem treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSION. Zolpidem at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg per day to a maximum of 10 mg failed to reduce the latency to persistent sleep on polysomnographic recordings after 4 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents 6 through 17 years of age who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-associated insomnia.",
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AU - Shih, Weichung Joe

AU - Soubrane, Christina

AU - Reed, Michael D.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE. The goal was to evaluate the hypnotic efficacy of zolpidem at 0.25 mg/kg per day (maximum of 10 mg/day), compared with placebo, in children 6 through 17 years of age who were experiencing insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. METHODS. An 8-week, North American, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted. Patients underwent stratification according to age (6-11 years [N = 111] or 12-17 years [N = 90]) and were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the study drug or placebo (in a 2:1 ratio). The primary efficacy variable was latency to persistent sleep between weeks 3 and 6. Secondary efficacy variables also were assessed, and behavioral and cognitive components of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were monitored. Safety was assessed on the basis of reports of adverse events, abnormal laboratory data, vital signs, and physical examination findings. The potential for next-day residual effects also was assessed. RESULTS. The baseline-adjusted mean change in latency to persistent sleep at week 4 did not differ significantly between the zolpidem and placebo groups (-20.28 vs -21.27 minutes). However, differences favoring zolpidem were observed for the older age group in Clinical Global Impression scores at weeks 4 and 8. No next-day residual effects of treatment were associated with zolpidem, and no rebound phenomena occurred after treatment discontinuation. Central nervous system and psychiatric disorders were the most-frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (>5%) that were observed more frequently with zolpidem than with placebo; these included dizziness, headache, and hallucinations. Ten (7.4%) patients discontinued zolpidem treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSION. Zolpidem at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg per day to a maximum of 10 mg failed to reduce the latency to persistent sleep on polysomnographic recordings after 4 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents 6 through 17 years of age who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-associated insomnia.

AB - OBJECTIVE. The goal was to evaluate the hypnotic efficacy of zolpidem at 0.25 mg/kg per day (maximum of 10 mg/day), compared with placebo, in children 6 through 17 years of age who were experiencing insomnia associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. METHODS. An 8-week, North American, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted. Patients underwent stratification according to age (6-11 years [N = 111] or 12-17 years [N = 90]) and were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the study drug or placebo (in a 2:1 ratio). The primary efficacy variable was latency to persistent sleep between weeks 3 and 6. Secondary efficacy variables also were assessed, and behavioral and cognitive components of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were monitored. Safety was assessed on the basis of reports of adverse events, abnormal laboratory data, vital signs, and physical examination findings. The potential for next-day residual effects also was assessed. RESULTS. The baseline-adjusted mean change in latency to persistent sleep at week 4 did not differ significantly between the zolpidem and placebo groups (-20.28 vs -21.27 minutes). However, differences favoring zolpidem were observed for the older age group in Clinical Global Impression scores at weeks 4 and 8. No next-day residual effects of treatment were associated with zolpidem, and no rebound phenomena occurred after treatment discontinuation. Central nervous system and psychiatric disorders were the most-frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (>5%) that were observed more frequently with zolpidem than with placebo; these included dizziness, headache, and hallucinations. Ten (7.4%) patients discontinued zolpidem treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSION. Zolpidem at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg per day to a maximum of 10 mg failed to reduce the latency to persistent sleep on polysomnographic recordings after 4 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents 6 through 17 years of age who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-associated insomnia.

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