Contributions of polyclonal malaria, gametocytemia, and pneumonia to infant severe anemia incidence in malaria hyperendemic Pemba, Tanzania

Thomas Jaenisch, Sunil Sazawal, Arup Dutta, Saikat Deb, Mahdi Ramsan, David J Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The causative factors for severe anemia incidence in sub-Saharan Africa are multifactorial. In an observational, longitudinal study of two cohorts of about 300 infants followed-up for six months in a malaria hyperendemic area, the risk factors for severe anemia incidence were clinical malaria and pneumonia, which outweighed nutritional and sociodemographic factors. Severe anemia incidence was 1-2/year at age 2 months, peaked around 6-7/year at age 7-12 months, and decreased back to 1-2/year at age 16-22 months. The age-dependent increase of severe anemia incidence was shown to be parallel to the age-dependent increase of clinical malaria. Previous clinical malaria episodes increased the severe anemia risk by 80%, and gametocyte carriage and pneumonia at prior visit was associated with a six-fold increase and a > 10-fold increase, respectively. The role of pneumonia and malaria as risk factors, and areas for interventions for severe anemia, should not be underestimated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-930
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Indian Ocean Islands
Tanzania
Malaria
Anemia
Pneumonia
Incidence
Africa South of the Sahara
Observational Studies
Longitudinal Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Contributions of polyclonal malaria, gametocytemia, and pneumonia to infant severe anemia incidence in malaria hyperendemic Pemba, Tanzania. / Jaenisch, Thomas; Sazawal, Sunil; Dutta, Arup; Deb, Saikat; Ramsan, Mahdi; Sullivan, David J.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 86, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 925-930.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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