Contribution of relative leptin and adiponectin deficiencies in premature infants to chronic intermittent hypoxia: Exploring a new hypothesis

Estelle B Gauda, Zankhana Master

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) occurs frequently in premature infants who have apnea of prematurity. Immaturity of the respiratory network from low central respiratory drive and the greater contribution of the carotid body on baseline breathing leads to respiratory instability in premature infants presenting as apnea and periodic breathing. During the 2nd week after birth, the smallest and the youngest premature infants have increased frequency of apnea and periodic breathing and associated oxygen desaturations that can persist for weeks after birth. CIH increases the production of reactive oxygen species that causes tissue damage. Premature infants have decreased capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species. Oxidative injury is the cause of many of the co-morbidities that are seen in premature infants. In this review we discuss who low fat mass and the resulting relative deficiencies in leptin and adiponectin could contribute to the increase frequency of oxygen desaturations that occurs days after birth in the smallest and youngest premature infants. Leptin is a central respiratory stimulant and adiponectin protects the lung from vascular leak, oxidative injury and vascular remodeling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalRespiratory Physiology and Neurobiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast milk leptin
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • Carotid body
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • SGA IUGR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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