Contrast Sensitivity and Color Vision in HIV-infected Individuals Without Infectious Retinopathy

Kayur H. Shah, Gary N. Holland, Fei Yu, Mark L Van Natta, Steven Nusinowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the relationship between abnormal contrast sensitivity and abnormal color vision among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals who have normal visual acuity and to seek host factors that predict these abnormalities. Design: Noninterventional, cross-sectional study. Methods: We evaluated 71 HIV-infected subjects with visual acuity of 20/25 or better, clear media, and no vision-threatening retinal lesions. Visual function was determined using the Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity test and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue color test (FM-100). Results were compared with published values for normal populations and to measures of HIV disease severity. We evaluated two levels of impairment for each visual function. "Mild dysfunction" was defined as ≥1 standard deviation (SD), but

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume142
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

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Color Vision
Contrast Sensitivity
HIV
Visual Acuity
Vision Disorders
Virus Diseases
Reference Values
Color
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Contrast Sensitivity and Color Vision in HIV-infected Individuals Without Infectious Retinopathy. / Shah, Kayur H.; Holland, Gary N.; Yu, Fei; Van Natta, Mark L; Nusinowitz, Steven.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 142, No. 2, 08.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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