Contour estimation in tagged cardiac magnetic resonance images

Michael Alan Guttman, Elliot R. McVeigh, Jerry L. Prince

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Tracking magnetic resonance tags in myocardial tissue promises to be an effective tool in the assessment of myocardial motion and deformation [1]. The amount of data acquired is very large, requiring automated tracking methods. We describe a hierarchy of image processing steps that quickly detect the contours of the myocardial boundaries of the left ventricle (LV) and the spines of tags placed in the myocardium. We are currently using our technique to process short axis (SA) images containing a radial tag pattern and long axis (LA) images containing a parallel tag pattern. Other tag patterns, such as striped tags or a rectangular grid, may be detected with minor modifications to the algorithm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 1992
EditorsJean Pierre Morucci, Robert Plonsey, Jean Louis Coatrieux, Swamy Laxminarayan
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1856-1857
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)0780307852
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Event14th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 1992 - Paris, France
Duration: Oct 29 1992Nov 1 1992

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
Volume5
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Conference

Conference14th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 1992
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period10/29/9211/1/92

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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