Continuous Negative Chest-Wall Pressure

Successful Use for Severe Respiratory Distress in an Adult

Shyamal K. Sanyal, Ruth Bernal, Walter T. Hughes, Sandor Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Continuous negative pressure (CNP) around the chest-wall and lower parts of the body was used to treat progressively severe hypoxemia in a spontaneously breathing adult with diffuse alveolar disease. Therapy with CNP produced a substantial increase in arterial oxygen tension that was sustained and permitted a decrease in oxygen requirements to 40% within 24 hours. There were concomitant decreases in intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt and respiratory frequency. During CNP therapy, no adverse effects on heart rate or blood pressure were detected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1727-1728
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume236
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 11 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Thoracic Wall
Pressure
Oxygen
Human Body
Arterial Pressure
Respiration
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Continuous Negative Chest-Wall Pressure : Successful Use for Severe Respiratory Distress in an Adult. / Sanyal, Shyamal K.; Bernal, Ruth; Hughes, Walter T.; Feldman, Sandor.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 236, No. 15, 11.10.1976, p. 1727-1728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanyal, Shyamal K. ; Bernal, Ruth ; Hughes, Walter T. ; Feldman, Sandor. / Continuous Negative Chest-Wall Pressure : Successful Use for Severe Respiratory Distress in an Adult. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1976 ; Vol. 236, No. 15. pp. 1727-1728.
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