Continuing social disparities despite upward trends in sexual and reproductive health service use among young women in the United States

Kelli Stidham Hall, Caroline Moreau, James Trussell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Building upon previous work describing declining rates and socioeconomic disparities in sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service use among young women in the United States, we reexamined patterns and determinants of SRH service use in 2006-2010. Study Design: We used the latest data from the National Survey of Family Growth to evaluate SRH service use including contraceptive, sexually transmitted infection (STI) and other gynecological exam services among 3780 women ages 15-24 years. We compared proportions of service use across survey years and employed multiple logistic regression to estimate the influence of time and women's sociodemographic characteristics on the likelihood of SRH service use. Results: The proportion of women using SRH services increased from 50% (2006-2007) to 54% (2007-2008) and 57% (2008-2010) [all year odds ratios (ORs) 1.4, p values<.03]. Among sexually experienced women, the proportions using SRH and contraceptive services were unchanged, while STI service use increased from 22% (2006-2007) to 33% (2008-2009) (OR 1.7, confidence interval 1.1-2.4, p=.009). Differentials in service use existed across sociodemographic groups, largely with lower proportions of service use among women of social disadvantage. Conclusions: Our results suggest a reversal of negative trends but continuing social disparities in young women's use of SRH services in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-686
Number of pages6
JournalContraception
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Contraception
  • Health services
  • Sexual and reproductive health
  • Sexually transmitted infection
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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