Contingent reinforcement increases cocaine abstinence during outpatient treatment and 1 year of follow-up

Stephen T. Higgins, Conrad J. Wong, Gary J. Badger, Doris E. Haug Ogden, Robert L. Dantona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study assessed whether contingent incentives can be used to reinforce cocaine abstinence in dependent outpatients. Seventy cocaine- dependent outpatients were randomized into 2 conditions. All participants received 24 weeks of treatment and 1 year of follow-up. The treatment provided to all participants combined counseling based on the community reinforcement approach with incentives in the form of vouchers exchangeable for retail items. In 1 condition, incentives were delivered contingent on cocaine-free urinalysis results, whereas in the other condition incentives were delivered independent of urinalysis results. Abstinence-contingent incentives significantly increased cocaine abstinence during treatment and 1 year of follow-up compared with noncontingent incentives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-72
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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