Consumer response and satisfaction to prepackaged antimalarial drugs for children in Aba, Nigeria

Kabiru K. Salami, William R Brieger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In July 2003, a consortium of three USAID partners launched a project to promote the correct use of color-coded, age-specific, prepackaged drugs (PPDs) to treat malaria promptly in preschool-aged children in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria. A 3-pronged promotional approach included training of patent medicine vendors (PMVs), home visits by community health promoters, and mass media, Five hundred seventy respondents were interviewed in February-March 2004. People heard about the PPDs from medicine sellers (33.4%), health workers (24.3%), the electronic mass media (18.4%), and friends or relatives (13.5%). Most children (81,1%) took Robaquine (chloroquine-CQ), while 108 (18.9%) took Fansidar (sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-SP). The median amount paid for Robaquine was N50 ($0.36) and for Fansidar, N80 ($0.57). Respondents rated the effectiveness of the PPD treatment as very effective (86.8%). Most respondents had something positive to say about the drug (94.9%) and the packaging (93.8%). Only 19.5%) had a complaint about either the drug or the packaging. Overall, 454 (83.9%) received the correct age-appropriate packet. Continuing education is needed for the PMVs to ensure that they obtain accurate age information about the child and sell the age-specific packet. Underdosing is just as serious a concern as overdosing in Nigeria where parasite resistance is rapidly developing for both drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-229
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Quarterly of Community Health Education
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Antimalarials
Nigeria
Drug Packaging
drug
Nonprescription Drugs
Mass Media
Pharmaceutical Preparations
United States Agency for International Development
medicine
mass media
patent
House Calls
Continuing Education
Health
Chloroquine
Preschool Children
Malaria
Parasites
Color
Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education

Cite this

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title = "Consumer response and satisfaction to prepackaged antimalarial drugs for children in Aba, Nigeria",
abstract = "In July 2003, a consortium of three USAID partners launched a project to promote the correct use of color-coded, age-specific, prepackaged drugs (PPDs) to treat malaria promptly in preschool-aged children in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria. A 3-pronged promotional approach included training of patent medicine vendors (PMVs), home visits by community health promoters, and mass media, Five hundred seventy respondents were interviewed in February-March 2004. People heard about the PPDs from medicine sellers (33.4{\%}), health workers (24.3{\%}), the electronic mass media (18.4{\%}), and friends or relatives (13.5{\%}). Most children (81,1{\%}) took Robaquine (chloroquine-CQ), while 108 (18.9{\%}) took Fansidar (sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-SP). The median amount paid for Robaquine was N50 ($0.36) and for Fansidar, N80 ($0.57). Respondents rated the effectiveness of the PPD treatment as very effective (86.8{\%}). Most respondents had something positive to say about the drug (94.9{\%}) and the packaging (93.8{\%}). Only 19.5{\%}) had a complaint about either the drug or the packaging. Overall, 454 (83.9{\%}) received the correct age-appropriate packet. Continuing education is needed for the PMVs to ensure that they obtain accurate age information about the child and sell the age-specific packet. Underdosing is just as serious a concern as overdosing in Nigeria where parasite resistance is rapidly developing for both drugs.",
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