Consumer credit, chronic disease and risk behaviours

Lorraine Dean, Emily Knapp, Sevly Snguon, Yusuf Ransome, Dima M. Qato, Kala Visvanathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Credit scores have been identified as a marker of disease burden. This study investigated credit scores' association with chronic diseases and health behaviours that are associated with chronic diseases. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis included data on 2083 residents of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA in 2015. Nine-digit ZIP code level FICO credit scores were appended to individual self-reported chronic diseases (obesity, diabetes, hypertension) and related health behaviours (smoking, exercise, and salt intake and medication adherence among those with hypertension). Models adjusted for individual-level and area-level demographics and retail pharmacy accessibility. Results: Median ZIP code credit score was 665 (SD=58). In adjusted models, each 50-point increase in ZIP code credit score was significantly associated with: 8% lower chronic disease risk; 6% lower overweight/obesity risk, 19% lower diabetes risk; 9% lower hypertension risk and 14% lower smoking risk. Other health behaviours were not significantly associated. Compared with high prime credit, subprime credit score was significantly associated with a 15%-70% increased risk of chronic disease, following a dose-response pattern with a prime rating. Conclusion: Higher area level credit scores may be associated with greater chronic disease prevalence but not necessarily with related health behaviours. Area-level consumer credit may make a novel contribution to identifying chronic disease patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Risk-Taking
Chronic Disease
Health Behavior
Hypertension
Obesity
Smoking
Medication Adherence
Salts
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography

Keywords

  • chronic disease
  • consumer credit
  • diabetes
  • hypertension
  • obesity
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Consumer credit, chronic disease and risk behaviours. / Dean, Lorraine; Knapp, Emily; Snguon, Sevly; Ransome, Yusuf; Qato, Dima M.; Visvanathan, Kala.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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