Constitutive laws for biomechanical modeling of refractive surgery

Michael R. Bryant, Peter J McDonnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Membrane inflation tests were performed on fresh, intact human corneas using a fiber optic displacement probe to measure the apical displacements. Finite element models of each test were used to identify the material properties for four different constitutive laws commonly used to model corneal refractive surgery. Finite element models of radial keratotomy using the different best-fit constitutive laws were then compared. The results suggest that the nonlinearity in the response of the cornea is material rather than geometric, and that material nonlinearity is important for modeling refractive surgery. It was also found that linear transverse isotropy is incapable of representing the anisotropy that has been experimentally measured by others, and that a hyperelastic law is not suitable for modeling the stiffening response of the cornea.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-481
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume118
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Refractive Surgical Procedures
Cornea
Surgery
Radial Keratotomy
Anisotropy
Economic Inflation
Fiber optics
Materials properties
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Constitutive laws for biomechanical modeling of refractive surgery. / Bryant, Michael R.; McDonnell, Peter J.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 118, No. 4, 11.1996, p. 473-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{490c82b84e05492bbf72fa8e17f41a04,
title = "Constitutive laws for biomechanical modeling of refractive surgery",
abstract = "Membrane inflation tests were performed on fresh, intact human corneas using a fiber optic displacement probe to measure the apical displacements. Finite element models of each test were used to identify the material properties for four different constitutive laws commonly used to model corneal refractive surgery. Finite element models of radial keratotomy using the different best-fit constitutive laws were then compared. The results suggest that the nonlinearity in the response of the cornea is material rather than geometric, and that material nonlinearity is important for modeling refractive surgery. It was also found that linear transverse isotropy is incapable of representing the anisotropy that has been experimentally measured by others, and that a hyperelastic law is not suitable for modeling the stiffening response of the cornea.",
author = "Bryant, {Michael R.} and McDonnell, {Peter J}",
year = "1996",
month = "11",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "473--481",
journal = "Journal of Biomechanical Engineering",
issn = "0148-0731",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME)",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Constitutive laws for biomechanical modeling of refractive surgery

AU - Bryant, Michael R.

AU - McDonnell, Peter J

PY - 1996/11

Y1 - 1996/11

N2 - Membrane inflation tests were performed on fresh, intact human corneas using a fiber optic displacement probe to measure the apical displacements. Finite element models of each test were used to identify the material properties for four different constitutive laws commonly used to model corneal refractive surgery. Finite element models of radial keratotomy using the different best-fit constitutive laws were then compared. The results suggest that the nonlinearity in the response of the cornea is material rather than geometric, and that material nonlinearity is important for modeling refractive surgery. It was also found that linear transverse isotropy is incapable of representing the anisotropy that has been experimentally measured by others, and that a hyperelastic law is not suitable for modeling the stiffening response of the cornea.

AB - Membrane inflation tests were performed on fresh, intact human corneas using a fiber optic displacement probe to measure the apical displacements. Finite element models of each test were used to identify the material properties for four different constitutive laws commonly used to model corneal refractive surgery. Finite element models of radial keratotomy using the different best-fit constitutive laws were then compared. The results suggest that the nonlinearity in the response of the cornea is material rather than geometric, and that material nonlinearity is important for modeling refractive surgery. It was also found that linear transverse isotropy is incapable of representing the anisotropy that has been experimentally measured by others, and that a hyperelastic law is not suitable for modeling the stiffening response of the cornea.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030297968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030297968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 473

EP - 481

JO - Journal of Biomechanical Engineering

JF - Journal of Biomechanical Engineering

SN - 0148-0731

IS - 4

ER -