Concurrent sexual partnerships among urban African American high-risk women with main sex partners

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To determine correlates of concurrent sexual partnerships among high-risk low-income urban African American women, survey responses of 337 women who had main sexual partners for over 6 months and reported high-risk behaviors were analyzed; 142 of these women also reported other sexual partnerships within the past 90 days. Unadjusted analyses showed that concurrency was significantly associated with relationship status, sexual debut, forced sex, incarceration of self and partners, depression, drug use, known or suspected partner nonmonogamy, and partner drug use. Age of sexual debut, relationship status, and indicators of problem drug use remained significantly associated with concurrency when controlling for individual factors, and only indicators of problem drug use and known or suspected partner nonmonogamy remained significantly associated with concurrency when also controlling for partner characteristics. Our results suggest the presence of extensive sexual networks within this population and document the need for interventions that address drug abuse and partnership instability. Moreover, the strong association between concurrency and perceptions of partners' nonmonogamy suggest the need for intervention to target men and women in this core group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-333
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Concurrency
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Sexual networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Concurrent sexual partnerships among urban African American high-risk women with main sex partners'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this