Computer versus lecture: A comparison of two methods of teaching oral medication administration in a nursing skills laboratory

Pamela R. Jeffries

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of both an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM and a traditional lecture for teaching oral medication administration to nursing students. A randomized pretest/posttest experimental design was used. Forty-two junior baccalaureate nursing students beginning their fundamentals nursing course were recruited for this study at a large university in the midwestern United States. The students ranged in age from 19 to 45. Seventy-three percent reported having average computer skills and experience, while 15% reported poor to below average skills. Two methods were compared for teaching oral medication administration - a scripted lecture with black and white overhead transparencies, in addition to an 18-minute videotape on medication administration, and an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM program, covering the same content. There were no significant (p < .05) baseline differences between the computer and lecture groups by education or computer skills. Results showed significant differences between the two groups in cognitive gains and student satisfaction (p = .01), with the computer group demonstrating higher student satisfaction and more cognitive gains than the lecture group. The groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly. Importantly, time on task using the CD-ROM was less, with 96% of the learners completing the program in 2 hours or less, compared to 3 hours of class time for the lecture group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-329
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nursing Education
Volume40
Issue number7
StatePublished - Oct 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

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