Computer-based typing and keypad skills training outcomes of unemployed injection drug users in a therapeutic workplace

Erin M. Dillon, Conrad J. Wong, Christine E. Sylvest, Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Kenneth Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Therapeutic Workplace is an employment-based treatment for chronic drug misuse and unemployment. As a part of this intervention, participants are taught skills to perform data entry jobs and are paid based on attendance and productivity. In this study, computerized typing and keypad training programs were evaluated in recently detoxified HIV-positive injection drug users (n = 32) enrolled in the Therapeutic Workplace treatment program between October 2000 and September 2001. Results show that trainees can be taught fundamental typing and keypad skills in an average of 51.48 and 1.73 h of training, respectively, administered over 17.91 and 12.59 weeks, respectively. Overall, the results demonstrate that adults with long histories of chronic unemployment and drug addiction can reliably acquire typing and keypad skills and do so over relatively short periods of time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2325-2353
Number of pages29
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume39
Issue number13-14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Keywords

  • Employment
  • Keyboarding
  • Reinforcement
  • Substance use
  • Vocational rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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