Components of delay in the pre-hospital phase of acute myocardial infarction

Arthur B. Simon, Manning Feinleib, Howard K. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One hundred sixty patients from a defined population with acute myocardial infarction were questioned about their activities before hospital arrival. Hospital arrival time was divided into prodromal period, patient decision time, lay consultation period, medical decision time and travel time. Forty-eight percent experienced prodromal chest pain before the acute onset of symptoms. The median hospital arrival time for all patients was 2 hours, 45 minutes. Hospital arrival time was significantly prolonged in patients experiencing an increase in the severity of angina pectoris, and in those with a physician decision time of more than 1 hour. Implications for intervention techniques are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-482
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1972
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Myocardial Infarction
Prodromal Symptoms
Angina Pectoris
Chest Pain
Referral and Consultation
Physicians
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Components of delay in the pre-hospital phase of acute myocardial infarction. / Simon, Arthur B.; Feinleib, Manning; Thompson, Howard K.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 30, No. 5, 1972, p. 476-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simon, Arthur B. ; Feinleib, Manning ; Thompson, Howard K. / Components of delay in the pre-hospital phase of acute myocardial infarction. In: The American Journal of Cardiology. 1972 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 476-482.
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