Compliance with Surgical Care Improvement Project for Body Temperature Management (SCIP Inf-10) Is Associated with Improved Clinical Outcomes

Andrew V. Scott, Jerry L. Stonemetz, Jack O. Wasey, Daniel J. Johnson, Richard J. Rivers, Colleen G. Koch, Steven M. Frank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In an effort to measure and improve the quality of perioperative care, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) was introduced in 2003. The SCIP guidelines are evidence-based process measures designed to reduce preventable morbidity, but it remains to be determined whether SCIP-measure compliance is associated with improved outcomes. Methods: The authors retrospectively analyzed the electronic medical record data from 45,304 inpatients at a single institution to assess whether compliance with SCIP Inf-10 (body temperature management) was associated with a reduced incidence of morbidity and mortality. The primary outcomes were hospital-acquired infection and ischemic cardiovascular events. Secondary outcomes were mortality and hospital length of stay. Results: Body temperature on admission to the postoperative care unit was higher in the SCIP-compliant group (36.6° ± 0.5°C; n = 44,064) compared with the SCIP-noncompliant group (35.5°± 0.5°C; n = 1,240) (P < 0.0001). SCIP compliance was associated with improved outcomes in both nonadjusted and risk-adjusted analyses. SCIP compliance was associated with a reduced incidence of hospital-acquired infection (3,312 [7.5%] vs.160 [12.9%] events; risk-adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.85), ischemic cardiovascular events (602 [1.4%] vs. 38 [3.1%] events; risk-adjusted OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.92), and mortality (617 [1.4%] vs. 60 [4.8%] events; risk-adjusted OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.58). Median (interquartile range) hospital length of stay was also decreased: 4 (2 to 8) versus 5 (2 to 14) days; P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Compliance with SCIP Inf-10 body temperature management guidelines during surgery is associated with improved clinical outcomes and can be used as a quality measure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-125
Number of pages10
JournalAnesthesiology
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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