COMPLIANCE TRAINING AND BEHAVIORAL COVARIATION IN THE TREATMENT OF MULTIPLE BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS

Dennis C. Russo, Michael F. Cataldo, Phyllis J. Cushing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study investigated the use of a compliance‐training procedure and its effect on untreated deviant child behaviors. Three children, each generally noncompliant to adult requests and with several additional problems, such as crying, aggression, and self‐injurious behavior, were trained in the compliance procedure under a multiple‐baséline design across therapists. Compliance was defined as the correct response to prespecified requests. Other classes of deviant child behavior were measured continuously throughout the study but not directly reinforced. The results of the study showed that (a) increases in compliance to requests were directly related to the contingencies employed; (b) decreases in untreated deviant behaviors occurred when compliance increased, even though no direct contingencies had been placed on these behaviors; and (c) the relationship between untreated deviant behaviors and compliance appeared to be maintained by a different set of events in each of the three children. The results are discussed in terms of behavioral covariation and generalization. 1981 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-222
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

Keywords

  • aggression
  • compliance
  • covariation
  • crying
  • self‐injurious behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Philosophy

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