Comparison of Uninsured and Privately Insured Hospital Patients

Condition on Admission, Resource Use, and Outcome

Jack Hadley, Earl P. Steinberg, Judith Feder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To investigate the association between insurance status and condition on admission, resource use, and in-hospital mortality, we analyzed discharge abstracts for 592 598 patients hospitalized in 1987 in a national sample of hospitals. In 13 of 16 age-sex-race—specific cohorts, the uninsured had a 44% to 124% higher risk of in-hospital mortality at the time of admission than did the privately insured. After controlling for this difference, the actual in-hospital death rate was 1.2 to 3.2 times higher among uninsured patients in 11 of 16 cohorts. The uninsured also were 29% to 75% less likely to undergo each of five high-cost or high-discretion procedures and 50% less likely to have normal results on tissue pathology reports for biopsies performed during five of seven different endoscopic procedures. Our results suggest that insurance status is associated with a broad spectrum of aspects of hospital care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-379
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume265
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 16 1991

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Insurance Coverage
Hospital Mortality
Pathology
Biopsy
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Comparison of Uninsured and Privately Insured Hospital Patients : Condition on Admission, Resource Use, and Outcome. / Hadley, Jack; Steinberg, Earl P.; Feder, Judith.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 265, No. 3, 16.01.1991, p. 374-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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