Comparison of the urine leukocyte esterase test to a nucleic acid amplification test for screening non-health care-seeking male soldiers for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections

Billie Jo Wood, Joel C. Gaydos, Kelly T. McKee, Charlotte A Gaydos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We evaluated the Leukocyte Esterase Test (LET) as a screening tool by testing urine from 1,438 non-health care-seeking male Army basic trainees with LET and a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test. Compared to Nucleic Acid Amplification Test results, LET sensitivity and specificity for detection of chlamydia and gonorrhea were 45.8% and 97.4%, and 60.0% and 96.2%, respectively. The prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhea was 3.3% and 0.3%, respectively. In this population, the prevalence of gonorrhea was too low to produce reliable estimates of performance characteristics of the LET for gonorrhea. The LET is not warranted for use in screening non-health care-seeking male Army trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)770-772
Number of pages3
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume172
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Chlamydia trachomatis
Military Personnel
Gonorrhea
Urine
Infection
Chlamydia
leukocyte esterase
Sensitivity and Specificity
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of the urine leukocyte esterase test to a nucleic acid amplification test for screening non-health care-seeking male soldiers for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections",
abstract = "We evaluated the Leukocyte Esterase Test (LET) as a screening tool by testing urine from 1,438 non-health care-seeking male Army basic trainees with LET and a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test. Compared to Nucleic Acid Amplification Test results, LET sensitivity and specificity for detection of chlamydia and gonorrhea were 45.8{\%} and 97.4{\%}, and 60.0{\%} and 96.2{\%}, respectively. The prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhea was 3.3{\%} and 0.3{\%}, respectively. In this population, the prevalence of gonorrhea was too low to produce reliable estimates of performance characteristics of the LET for gonorrhea. The LET is not warranted for use in screening non-health care-seeking male Army trainees.",
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