Comparison of the results of electrophysiologic testing after short-term and long-term treatment with amiodarone in patients with ventricular tachycardia

Shimon Rosenheck, Joao Sousa, Hugh Calkins, Stephan Schmaltz, Michael de Buitleir, Alan H. Kadish, Fred Morady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The results of electrophysiologic testing after short-term and long-term treatment with amiodarone were compared in 71 patients with ventricular tachycardia. Electrophysiologic testing was performed in the baseline state after 11 ± 3 days of treatment with 1.2 to 2.4 gm/day of amiodarone, and after 13 ± 4 weeks of therapy with a daily amiodarone dose of 400 mg. After short-term therapy, 62% of the patients had an adequate response to amiodarone. In 27 patients who were hemodynamically unstable, ventricular tachycardia was induced and became noninducible or hemodynamically stable after combination therapy with a class I agent. Among 18 patients who did not have inducible ventricular tachycardia after short-term therapy, eight (44%) had inducible, hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia after long-term treatment with amiodarone. On the other hand, six of the 27 patients who had hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia after short-term therapy had an adequate response after long-term treatment with amiodarone. Therefore an adequate electrophysiologic response after short-term therapy does not guarantee a similar response after long-term treatment, and an inadequate response after short-term therapy does not always predict a similar response after long-term therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1693-1698
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume121
Issue number6 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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